Free book readings at Brooklyn Bridge Park, an olfactory tour of the 7, and the annual Bastille Day block party.

MONDAY, JULY 9:  Books Beneath the Bridge inaugural reading at Brooklyn Bridge Park. The brand new outdoor literature series will feature 6 evenings curated by local, independent bookstores. Each program will include a reading, Q&A, and book signing with the authors. 7 – 8 pm. FREE.

TUESDAY, JULY 10: Attend a free concert by The Knights in Central Park. For the 107th season of free Classical music at the Naumbaug Bandshell, The Knights will be playing on July 10th and 24th. Concerts are at the Naumbaug Bandshell, south of the 72nd Street cross-drive. 7:30pm; FREE.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 11: The first occurrence of Manhattanhenge this year was ruined by a cloudy sky, but this time promises incredible sunsets that fully illuminate the cross-streets. The most dramatic photographs could arguably be taken amidst the notable architecture on 34th and 42nd street, but any of the cross streets will have a nice view. Be sure to get there early as it gets crowded, especially at the Tudor City Bridge. Sunset at 8:24pm; FREE.

Also on Wednesday: Summerscreen at McCarren Park opens with Cruel Intentions. Also featuring Dirty Dancing, The Princess Bride and Top Gun on July 25th, August 1st and 8th, respectively. 6pm music performance, 7pm movie; FREE.

THURSDAY, JULY 12: Opening night of JAPAN CUTS, the New York Festival of Contemporary Japanese Film. In its sixth consecutive year, JAPAN CUTS 2012 includes close to 40 titles screening from July 12th to 28th, with 12 co-presentations with the New York Asian Film Festival (NYAFF, 11th edition), with which it forms a winning summer fest combination that shows 100 films annually. As its centerpiece, this year’s edition of the festival will highlight the career of living Japanese film legend Koji Yakusho. 6:30pm; $12.

FRIDAY, JULY 13: The Clock is a spectacular and hypnotic 24-hour work of video art by renowned artist Christian Marclay. Marclay has brought together thousands of clips from the entire history of cinema, from silent films to the present, each featuring an exact time on a clock, on a watch, or in dialogue. The resulting collage tells the accurate time at any given moment, making it both a work of art and literally a working timepiece: a cinematic memento mori. Runs continuously from Fridays at 8:00 am through Sundays at 10:00 pm. Closed Mondays. David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center. FREE.

SATURDAY, JULY 14: “7 Through the Nose” Walk led by Josely Carvalho. Participants will explore their own senses of smell and its powerful relationship to memory and emotion. Starting in Times Square, taking the subway and then sniffing through Flushing, the group will identify synthetic smells (i.e. smells created to entice sales: such as french fries and store-specific fragrances) and existing natural urban smells, (i.e.sweat, herbs, fish, bread and urine). Via memory, metaphor and association, Josely will work with each participant to record smells in individual and collective scent journals; an evanescent geography of odors. Register on their website. 4pm; $20.

The Skint’s 2nd Annual Bastille Day Bash takes place at Dekalb Market replete with burlesque, baguette eating contest and booze. 6-10pm; $12 advance, $15 door.

SUNDAY, JULY 15: The annual Bastille Day block party commences at 12 pm and will occupy all of 60th Street from 5th Avenue to Lexington Avenue. For more than ten years, Bastille Day on 60th Street has been the largest public celebration of the historic friendship between France and the United States commemorating France’s own Independence Day on July 14, 1789. Shop the French-themed market stalls, try your luck at the prize drawing, and stop by the French Institute Alliance Française (FIAF) at 22 East 60th Street for wine and cheese tastings. Vive la France! FREE.

Also on Sunday: The MP3 Experiment by Improv Everywhere. Read our past coverage of the MP3 Experiment and other pranks organized by Improv Everywhere.

Check out more things to do on our event page.

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