New York City

New York State Pavilion, the iconic remnant of 1964-1965 World’s Fair in Flushing Meadows Corona Park, has a new advocate. Matthew Silva, a teacher and filmmaker, is hoping to unravel the history of the Queens landmark in his documentary, according to Curbed.

The site, originally known as the Corona Ash Dumps, is an important piece in modern architectural and planning history.  It was cleared by the “master builder” of mid-20th century New York City Robert Moses in preparation for the 1939-1940 World’s Fair, and later used for the 1964-1965 World’s Fair. The New York State Pavilion also included the adjacent “Theaterama,” which exhibited pop art by Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein among others.

About halfway to his $5,000 fundraising goal, Silva is rallying support for the documentary via GoFundMe, Facebook and Twitter before next April – the 50th anniversary of the fair in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park.

NY State Pavilion 1964 World's Fair Untapped CitiesPhoto Credit: Wally Gobetz, Source: Flickr

Los Angeles

Always wanted to go to the zoo after hours, get drinks and hang out with zoo animals?  Now is your chance! The LA Zoo is hosting a series of events called “Roaring Nights” on  July 11, July 18, and July 25 from 7PM to 10PM. Rawr! More info here.


Play Me, I’m Yours, by British artist Luke Jerram has now reached over two million people worldwide. Since 2008 more than 800 pianos have already been installed in 36 cities across the globe. It is now the last week when the project is live in Paris so go ahead and play before it’s too late! Piano locations are available on the official website of the project.

playmeJamie Cullum playing street piano. Source: lukejerram.com


If you liked the Essential Guide to the Ruins of Super Science by Atlas Obscura we recommended last week, you might enjoy the piece by Urban Ghost Media on abandoned schools and universities. There is no denying the pull of those haunting spaces, overflowing with hidden memories. They are filled with a sense of absence that draws you in and chills you to the bone.

Speaking of the derelict and forgotten: Korean-American artist David Choe literally poured $10,000 into the streets of Detroit last week. As a creative form of economic stimulus he hid cash in various locations in the city, mostly in one dollar bills (but also in a few hundred dollar bills), and posted a note on his facebook page encouraging the people to venture out and find them.

992784_10151709880017733_2012447570_nA couch where David Choe hid money. Source: Next City.

Get in touch with the author @tendrebarbare.


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