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Here’s what the Untapped Cities staff has been reading and sharing this week, from a portable public square, missed connections, and street art written in code.

Last House Standing

Baltimore, Md.

A stand-alone row house in Baltimore, Maryland. Source: Slate.

Atlantic Cities highlighted Baltimore-based, German-born photographer Ben Marcin who shoots images of single row houses that stand in vacant lots in Baltimore, Camden, New Jersey, and Philadelphia. He started, “Last House Standing,” inspired by the single row houses alone in his own neighborhood. “Here they were, violently shorn of their neighbors like a gap-toothed pumpkin; most of the original decorative features still in place,” he tells Atlantic Cities. Baltimore has a $22 million, two-and-half-year plan to knock down 15oo abandoned houses like these. 

Fake Missed Connections

ship-that-pass-missed-connections-reenacted-bk-mag-untapped-citiesReenactment of the missed connection W4M / POWERHOUSE BOOKS from Ships That Pass. Source: Brooklyn Magazine.

In 2010, Brett Fletcher Lauer and Gretchen Scott asked people to create fake missed connections and post them to Craigslist, some which received real responses. Some of the writers included Paul Legault and Lena Dunham. Brooklyn Magazine has now done a photo shoot based on the project.

A Portable Pop-Up Public Square’s September Tour

Cricklewood-town-square-london-public-space-untapped-citiesThe Cricklewood Town Square, made of  faux brick, attaches to a rickshaw bicycle. Source: Zeitgeist.

In an effort to highlight the closure of public spaces in northwest London, Studio Kieren Jones, has created a portable Town Hall on wheels. Civic ideas agency Throughout September, the traveling public square goes to desolate outdoor areas in the suburb to hold events such as chess matches, film viewings, conversations, pop-up galleries, and pop-up libraries. [Via Atlantic Cities]

Street Art for Codebreakers

Fast Company-Binary Code Graffiti

Fast Company published photos of freehand graffiti art covered in Morse code, JavaScript, and binary on abandoned walls in London. The figures are renowned Britisih code-masters such as  Tim Berners-Lee, who invented the world wide web as well as Samuel Morse and Alan Turing, the godfather of coding. The art was commissioned by one of Europe’s largest festivals revolving around technology Campus Party that held its final day on Saturday.

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