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fineline

Fineline Tattoo opened in 1976 during the New York City ban on tattooing and is considered the longest continually running tattoo shop in Manhattan. It’s located on 1st Street and First Avenue in the East Village. Previously, Mike Bakaty, the founder and owner, operated underground for 36 years in secret back rooms and loft apartments. With the walls adorned with Bakaty’s original flash art, Fineline is definitely near and dear to our skin and to the history of NYC.

Mike Bakaty and his son, Mehai at Fineline

Mike Bakaty and his son, Mehai at Fineline

We interviewed Bakaty and asked him about tattooing and New York City:

When did you first fall in love with tattooing?

I’m still falling in love with tattooing. I got interested back in ’74 when I went to get some work covered up…I got more interested in ’75…and then by 1976 my interest was such that I started tattooing myself.

And you didn’t care that tattooing was illegal at the time in NY?

Hell yeah, I cared. Every time the phone rang I jumped thinking it was the cops looking to bust me. After 21 years eventually I got over jumping at the phone.

How do you feel at the Bowery now and all the changes going on?

Well, you know, it’s not the Bowery I lived on for 34 years, you know? Don’t know how I feel about the changes. When they first built the Whole Foods down here I thought who the hell is gonna come down here and buy food? We tried to save the building we lived in (McGurk’s Suicide Hall). I lived there for 34 years. Check out more on McGurk’s.

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What’s your opinion on Mildred Hull?

Millie Hull…well she was one of the first female tattooers I ever heard of. There’s a picture of her right there (points to picture on the wall).

This piece has her in it and some other legends like Charlie Wagner.

Well, it was us (Fineline) that brought tattooing back to the Bowery and the fact of the matter is I was totally blind to the fact that the Bowery had such tattoo history. I read somewhere the first heavily tattooed person exhibition was around 1876 right across from 295 (Bowery) where we lived…

Do you call this a parlor or a shop?

It’s a studio. I don’t see a parlor anywhere in here.

Can I ask how old you are? 

Well, I’m 77.

G-d Bless you, man! You don’t look a day over 60.

Well, thank you, I just passed the big 77. If I knew I was gonna get this old I’d have taken better care of myself (laughter).

You can read the expanded original version of the interview on Bowery Boogie. Get in touch with the author @RebelKnow or contact her at BoweryBoogie.com.

 

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