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imbible-history of drinking-untapped cities-NYCPhoto via Time Out NY.

We know many of our readers love discovering where to find the best hidden bars and speakeasies around the city. Well, thanks to Anthony Caporale’s show, The Imbible: A Spirited History of Drinking, you can now learn about the history of drinking in an authentic Tammany society speakeasy – the Huron Club, located in the historic SoHo Playhouse. Sit back and sip while mixologist and raconteur Caropale, paired with vocal stylings by The Backwaiters Acapella group, takes you through a lively history and scientific look at spirits.  You will not only learn about alcohol’s economic, political, and cultural impact on society, but you will also see live demonstrations of brewing beer and distilling liquors. Oh, and did we mention – you get three free cocktails with your tickets?

Huron Club-soho playhouse-Untapped Cities-imbible -NYC-001The Huron Club. Photo via WikiCommons. 

The location itself is worth a visit for its fascinating history. The Huron Club is an intimate 55 seat cabaret and bar steep. The SoHo Playhouse sits on Richmond Hill, once a colonial mansion where General George Washington set up headquarters. The house was later Aaron Burr’s home until the property passed into the hands of John Jacob Astor in 1817 and was converted into federalist-style row houses. One such house was designated as The Huron Club, located at 17 Van Dam Street, and became a popular meeting house for the the Democratic Party. By the turn of the century, Tammany Hall and his infamous machine were using Huron as a night club.

Host Anthony Caporale is now the Director of Beverages at New York’s award winning Institute of Culinary Arts. He is best known for his web series, Art of the Drink TV – a series many bartenders credit for the revival of the craft cocktail movement. He has also been featured on a variety of TV and radio programs like The Dr. Oz Show and FOX Money. For tickets to his The Imbible, click here.

Next, read about the top 11 best hidden bars in Manhattan  and the influences of Tammany Hall today. 

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