New R179 MTA Subway Cars Arrive for Testing at 207th Street Rail Yard to Replace C Line Trains

r179-subway-car-testing-207th-street-railyard-mta-2016Photo via New York Transit Museum

You know those old C trains with the ribbed metal pattern on the outside and gray seats on the inside? Often the air conditioning is broken and the cars make for a jerky ride. Well, the future is finally here in the form of the R179 train, long delayed and over budget. The first set of cars arrived for testing at the Overhaul Shop in the 207th Street Rail Yard in Inwood last week, as posted to Instagram by the New York Transit Museum. The first car, #3014 was delivered on September 6th.

r179-subway-car-testing-207th-street-railyard-mta-2016-004Car 3014 of the R179 series en route to the rail yard last week. Photo by David Plaza Newkirk

The cars are made by the company Bombardier, produced in Plattsburgh, New York and delivered by flatbed truck over 300 miles to New York City. The original 2012 press release had the R179 cars delivered for testing in “late 2014,” but is anything transit-related ever finished on time here in the city? The Transit Museum states that once tested, “300 of these cars are slated to run on the A, C, J and Z lines.” 

Interestingly, two of the main politicians quoted in this press release are Sheldon Silver and Dean Skelos, both whom have been convicted of corruption charges. Regardless, the R179 cars certainly sound like an upgrade. Not only are they about ten feet wider (similar to the new 7 trains), the cars will have “bright interiors, a state-of-the art climate-control system, digitized voice announcements and route signage, airbag suspension and energy-saving regenerative braking,” claimed the press release. These aren’t the wifi equipped subway cars that are in the works, however. The MTA expects that maintenance costs for the R179s will be 40% less than the R32s. 

r179-subway-car-testing-207th-street-railyard-mta-2016-2Car 3014 arriving to the 207th Street Overhaul Shop.Photo via Wikimedia by Dj Hammers

Next, check out the Top 10 Secrets of the NYC Subway.

 MTA, subway

2 Responses
  1. Ten feet wider than what? The tunnel sizes are the same since the IND was built in the 1930s and ’40s. Maybe these cars are ten feet LONGER, but they sure as heck can’t been even an inch wider!

    • michelle young Reply

      Hi Edward, that should say “wide” not “wider”! 🙂 It’s been updated.

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