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Posts by michelle young:

Articles By: michelle young

Michelle is the founder of Untapped Cities. Michelle can usually be found in New York (where she grew up), Paris, backpacking in South America or Southeast Asia, or in-transit between. She’s traveled to 40+ countries, has an obsession with buses and shoots with a Canon SLR camera. She is an author of 100 Ways to Make History, published by the New York Public Library and is currently working on a book on the history of Broadway for Arcadia. She holds a masters in urban planning from Columbia University, where she is an adjunct professor, a B.A. from Harvard in the History of Art & Architecture, and is a graduate of the Juilliard School of Music. Follow her on Twitter @untappedmich.


Clet-NYC-Lower East Side-Staton Street

We’re quite excited to see that French street artist Clet Abraham has arrived in New York City. We previously covered his witty sign hacks in Europe. He’s done his first hack on a Do Not Enter sign on Staton Street in the Lower East Side. We’ll be watching his Instagram to see what’s next!

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Bellevue Hospital Ambulance-1895-Vintage Photograph-NY-Byron Collection-MCNY-NYTimes StoreHorse-drawn ambulance at Bellevue Hospital in 1895. Image: Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

As many of you know, the first patient with Ebola in New York City is now quarantined at Bellevue Hospital on the east side of Manhattan. We thought we would look at vintage images of the fascinating complex, which has been around since 1736. Appropriately, it was actually founded as a quarantine hospital and is the oldest public hospital in the United States.

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Eugene de Salignac-Painters on a Bridge-Brooklyn Bridge-NYC

Today’s most popular reads: 10 Hidden Apartments in NYC & ParisHerald Center’s Original 1902 Limestone Facade Appears While Under Renovation

bhushan mondkar_Trinity cemetery

Recently, we put together our top 10 picks for an off-beat Halloween in NYC this year. One of those picks was spending Halloween in a crypt, with a Roaring ’20s band and unlimited alcohol. Sounds pretty great, right? Well, in partnership with New York Adventure Club we’re doing a giveaway for two free tickets to the event.

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Lego Statue of Liberty-Madison Square Park-NYCImage via Trevor O’Brien

In celebration of the new LEGO store in the Flatiron, there’s a 20-foot version of the Statue of Liberty in Madison Square Park, built over the course of four days with the help of passerby, children and tourists. Three master LEGO builders were on hand for the project. What’s even cooler is the backstory (we’re not sure if this was conscious on LEGO’s part, however). When the Statue of Liberty first arrived the United States, its torch was displayed in Madison Square Park to raise money for the construction of the pedestal. It sat near 25th Street across from General Worth Square. As the story goes, French politician Edoard Labouaye in 1870 proposed the statue as a gesture of goodwill between the two countries but Americans were critical of it, claiming that the U.S. shouldn’t have to contribute to a gift meant for them. `

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There’s something about architects and businessmen wanting to live in the places they create. And we’re not talking about a live-work studio. We’ve been noticing a historical trend of apartments in grand civic spaces–from apartments atop the Eiffel Tower, Radio City, Bergdorf Goodman, the second Madison Square Garden–to more modern-day expressions of exclusivity–a cabin in a loft in Brooklyn, suburban houses plopped atop existing apartment buildings, an Fifth Avenue apartment full of secret riddles and compartments. Here’s a little about each of these idiosyncratic apartments.

1. Stanford White’s Seduction Lair at Madison Square Garden

Second Madison Square Garden-Stanford White-Apartment-NYC

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