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Posts by michelle young:

Articles By: michelle young

Michelle is the founder of Untapped Cities. Michelle can usually be found in New York (where she grew up), Paris, backpacking in South America or Southeast Asia, or in-transit between. She’s traveled to 40+ countries, has an obsession with buses and shoots with a Canon SLR camera. She is an author of 100 Ways to Make History, published by the New York Public Library and is currently working on a book on the history of Broadway for Arcadia. She holds a masters in urban planning from Columbia University, where she is an adjunct professor, a B.A. from Harvard in the History of Art & Architecture, and is a graduate of the Juilliard School of Music. Follow her on Twitter @untappedmich.


NYU Furman Center-Foreign Born-NYC-Map

New York City is known as the “melting pot” of the United States, but just how many foreign born residents are there and where do they live? This is what the NYU Furman Center has tackled in a recently released map, tracking the 37% of New York City residents (from the 2010-2014 American Community Survey) who have come from another country. This is up more than 1% from the 2000 data. Each dot in the map represents 500 residents born in the respective country by Census tract.

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US Capitol Hill Subway System-Underground-Senate-Russell Senate Office Building-Wicker Seat Car-5

On a recent visit to Washington D.C., we had the opportunity to extensively check out the United States Capitol Subway System, one of the most unique in the world. The exclusive transit system is not exactly open to the public unless you’re a member of Congress or a staffer on Capitol Hill. It’s also one of the world’s shortest – the portion between the Senate to the Russell Senate Office Building is about 1000 feet and takes less than a minute. Riding US Capitol Subway system is mundane operating procedure for Capitol Hill employees, but a fascinating find for the lay people. 

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Photo by Bob Martin/Garden State Theatre Organ Society

Musical instruments are not always the first thing that comes to mind when you think of architecture, but they are often embedded into landmark buildings. This month, several other unique instruments are featured on display within museum exhibits. Here, we have curated a list of musical instruments you may have overlooked in your daily walk, or should check out on your next exploration.

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Todd W. Schneider is a software engineer who has been analyzing the New York City’s open data in his spare time, documenting the results on topics as varied as Citi Bike trips, Uber v. Taxi pickups, and non-city oriented topics like the 2016 election. With Citi Bike topping 10 million rides in 2015, Schneider decided to take a deep dive into the transportation system’s open data. One of the most fun maps he’s created in the bunch is an animation of the rides taken on September 16, 2015. The day is random (albeit a weekday) but Schneider uses it to show general trends in Citi Bike usage.

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SHoP_475 West 18th_Exterior Corner_SHoP Architects PC-Chelseas-High Line-Rendering-NYC-2

On the corner of 18th Street and 10th Avenue, diagonally across from a future entrance to the High Line sits five holdout buildings that harken back to an earlier era of the Meatpacking District. Brick buildings and warehouses dotted an area that was patrolled by “West Side Cowboys,” self-appointed safety vigilantes on horseback that prevented citizens from getting injured from street-level trains on 10th Avenue.

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Mayor Gaynor Plan for New Avenue-NYC-5th Avenue-6th Avenue.-2

In May of 1910, the ill-fated New York City mayor, William Jay Gaynor, proposed a new avenue to be added to Manhattan’s street grid that would go between Fifth and Sixth Avenue between 8th Street and 59th Street. While this might seem like a wild idea today, several new avenues were added to the original grid plotted by the Commissioners of New York City, like Lexington Avenue, Madison Avenue, and several thoroughfares uptown, like St. Nicholas Avenue. As a New York Times article reported on May 29th, 1910, the Gaynor’s avenue would be the same width as Fifth Avenue, then at 100 feet.

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