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Posts by michelle young:

Articles By: michelle young

Michelle is the founder of Untapped Cities. Michelle can usually be found in New York (where she grew up), Paris, backpacking in South America or Southeast Asia, or in-transit between. She’s traveled to 40+ countries, has an obsession with buses and shoots with a Canon SLR camera. She is an author of 100 Ways to Make History, published by the New York Public Library and is currently working on a book on the history of Broadway for Arcadia. She holds a masters in urban planning from Columbia University, where she is an adjunct professor, a B.A. from Harvard in the History of Art & Architecture, and is a graduate of the Juilliard School of Music. Follow her on Twitter @untappedmich.


Urban Layers-Downtown Manhattan-Morphocode-NYC

“…each block is covered with several layers of phantom architecture in the form of past occupancies, aborted projects and popular fantasies that provide alternative images to the New York that exists.”

A map tool that opens with a quote from Rem Koolhaas’ Delirious New York? How could we resist? Urban Layers by Morphocode allows you to trace the building history of New York City starting in 1765–with an added bonus of using up-to-date mapping tools like Mapbox to make everything look pretty and open source data like PLUTO and NYC Building Footprints. Those of us in the urban planning world use these data sets frequently, but this is a wonderful and fun way to introduce the general public to it.

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historic-Newsboys-and-Newsgirl-of-nyc1Newsboys and newsgirls on Newspaper Row, Park Row, NYC. Image via Library of Congress

While news continues to make its way around the world, it may be hard to imagine today that the publishing industry was at the epicenter of some of the world’s most important architectural feats. But this was the case in late 19th century New York City, when the daily newspaper industry was centered at Park Row, near City Hall. Such institutions included The New York Times, The New York Tribune and The New York World. 

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NY Historical Society-1914 Time Capsule-Lower Wall Street Business Men's Association-NY Historical Society-2014

Yesterday afternoon, two historic events occurred. First, the oldest known, unopened time capsule was opened with ceremonial pomp at the New York Historical Society. As we published about earlier, the bronze capsule was deposited by the Lower Wall Street Business Men’s Association in 1914 for an intended opening date of 1974, but it missed its date with destiny due to miscataloguing. Of most interest is that in the capsule there was believed to be a copy of a letter written in May 1774 at the Merchants’ Coffee House, believed to be the impetus for the united colonies and the American Revolution.

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It’s the second season of The Blacklist and Reddington is already up to no good. We’ve been documenting the film locations so far, just like we did with Season 1 and decided to share them with you early in the season as you guys have been asking for them. We’ll be continuously updating this article with new content each week. As you know, The Blacklist is filmed in New York City, which stands in as Washington D.C., its suburbs, and all the international locations Red and the team go to. Last season, they didn’t do much to conceal the New York locations (Meatpacking as Belarus?) but this year you have to know New York City pretty well to recognize some of the locations. Without further ado:

St. Patrick’s Cathedral aka Holy Trinity Church

St Patrick Cathedral-Fifth Avenue-Holy Trinity Church Blacklist-NYC

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x-defaultWhitney Studio. Photo via New York Studio School

Today, the Whitney Studio in Greenwich Village was named a National Treasure by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. A birthplace of the Modern American Art movement  the Whitney Studio served as the studio and private salon for the sculptor and arts patron, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney and as the first site of the Whitney Museum of Art. Whitney was the oldest daughter of Cornelius Vanderbilt, whom you may remember from his over-the-top French chateau mansion on Fifth Avenue and 57th Street.

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OBIT Life on the Dead Beat of The New York Times-NYC

Director Vanessa Gould, who previously helmed the documentary Between the Foldsjust released a new trailer for a forthcoming work called OBIT: Life on the Dead Beat of The New York Times, a documentary about the obituaries and obituary writers at The New York Times. “One day the edition of the newspaper will come out, and with any luck there will be something about me in it, but I won’t be reading it,” says author Christopher Hitchens who opens the trailer.

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