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Dry Dock 6-Brooklyn Navy Yard-NYC

Yesterday, we got a unique chance to see the dry docks at the Brooklyn Navy Yard from a unique angle: via the water. Most ferry boats and pleasure cruises rarely turn into the Navy Yard Basin (also known as Wallabout Bay), sticking to the most efficient path on the East River. But we were being taken to see the working waterfront in New York City aboard the historic Fireboat John J. Harvey, as part of the project to rehabilitate the S.S. Columbia, a passenger steamship from Detroit that will be making its way down the Hudson River to New York City next year.

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Tucked away in the northeast section of the Bronx is the lesser-known Pelham Bay Park, a reminder of the borough’s bucolic past. Former Parks Commissioner Robert Moses transformed the woodland area into a functioning park and recreational facility, complete with playgrounds, a golf course and a racetrack, but it has a long history dating back to before the Revolutionary War.

Here are ten secrets of Pelham Bay Park in the Bronx.

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roof-washington_squara_arch-washington_square_park-nyc-untapped_cities-devin_thomas

For over 100 years, the arch in Washington Square Park has been one of New York’s most famous monuments. Located in Greenwich Village, it was dedicated on May 4, 1895 to George Washington to celebrate the centennial of his presidential inauguration. It has since overlooked years of city history and cultural shifts. But while everyone is familiar with its exterior, the interior of the arch remains fairly mysterious. Closed off to the public, only a few people a year get the privilege of stepping inside of it. Here are some exclusive photos from inside the historic arch.  (more…)

woodlawn-cemetery-bronx-nyc-untapped-citiesAerial view of Woodlawn Cemetery. Image via Sanstead

Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx is not exactly unknown as it’s one of the largest cemeteries in New York City with a wide array of famous people buried there. But there is plenty about the cemetery that many denizens of New York do not know making some of the following secrets are certainly untapped. (more…)

park_avenue_tunnel-manhattan-1899-nyc-untapped_citiesPhoto taken circa 1899 by someone unknown

Today the Park Avenue Tunnel, running between 33rd and 40th Streets is a passage for cars, but before it was a roadway for motor vehicles, it was a train and trolley tunnel. Constructed in 1834, it was originally built for the New York & Harlem Railroad (NY&H) as an open cut, which ran steam engines as well as horsecars. In the 1850s, the open cut was bridged creating a tunnel to boost public safety by removing the train from Manhattan’s surface. The Park Avenue Tunnel became of the city’s oldest, accommodating trolley trucks and two-way traffic.  (more…)

Some of the Untapped Cities core staff has been on their annual electricity-less, internet free vacation on remote islands in Brittany, France so we missed this video in our inbox. But we’re back and want to share this dramatic drone video of the always mysterious North Brother Island, the abandoned island in New York City’s East River. We’ve previously covered its historical secrets and shared photographs from photographer Christopher Payne, a collaborator of Untapped Cities, who wrote the book  North Brother Island, The Last Unknown Place in New York CityWe’ve even visited the island ourselves, on a surprise stop with the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation and are anxiously awaiting the study that’s exploring the opening of North Brother Island to public access.

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