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untappedcities

Victory Arch-Flatiron District-NYC-UntappedImage via Library of Congress

Contrary to what you may be thinking, the white arch depicted in the image above is in fact not a vintage photograph of the arch at Washington Square Park. Instead, this mysterious New York City arch is what used to be called the “Victory Arch”, a temporary monument of wood and plaster built at 24th Street and Fifth Avenue in 1918. (more…)

Car accident on Park Avenue viaduct 1940s Round Up of Architectural Accidents Vintage NYC Photography Untapped Cities Sabrina RomanoCar Accident on Park Avenue viaduct, 1940s. Image via Facebook by Hiromi Bruni.

Technology has a bad habit of developing faster than humans do. When people aren’t up to speed about construction, some crazy accidents tend to occur… Who knew it was possible for a car to awkwardly balance itself on the edge of a viaduct while avoiding crashing into the ground below? Can you believe that the Empire State Building is still standing even after a bomber rammed into it creating a 20 foot hole in the middle of the building? Check out the vintage photos which reveal sometimes the truth is stranger than fiction.

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Here are our picks this week from our Untapped Cities Photo Pool. This week, we chose photos of places you don’t usually go with a theme of “the road less traveled. Remember, to have one of your photos entered in the running for a “best of” nod, just hashtag #untappedcities on Instagram or Twitter. Keep an eye on what contributors and readers are checking out by browsing the live feed.

Playmates Arch by Genna aka nothing_collapses

884bdc16b1e911e2aa5e22000a1f96ec_7 (more…)

other-bridges-of-nyc-round-up-5

We all love our iconic, innovative, and picturesque bridges (insert photos of the Brookly, Manhattan, and Queensboro Bridges here), but New York City is home to far more bridges, each with its own unique story to tell. Below, we round up some of the city’s “other” bridges, who have made the cut either for their obscurity, their interesting history, or their other distinguished features. (more…)

japanese house prospect park south brooklyn new york city untapped cities museum of the city of new yorkA Postcard of the Japanese house ca. 1915. The house has since been re-painted red-orange with teal beams. Image via Museum of the City of New York, via Old Images of New York

Urban legend tells that this Japanese house was built special for the Japanese Ambassador, and it was shipped over piece by piece from Japan. Neither of those stories are true. What is true, however, is that somebody actually lives in this Japanese style house south of Prospect Park in Flatbush-Ditmas Park. It was built in 1903, and currently, the house has landmark status and it is valued at over $1 million. (more…)

Lincoln Center-1963-Demolition

Introducing our new series with 6sqft, a publication on architecture, real estate and neighborhoods in New York City. 

The glossy cultured patina of Lincoln Center reveals nearly nothing of what the neighborhood once was, and New Yorkers, accustomed to the on-going cycle of building and demolition, have likely forgotten (or never knew) about the lively San Juan Hill that was demolished to make way for the famous cultural center. Any such development dating from the 1960s wouldn’t be without the fingerprints of the now-vilified Robert Moses, who was more than willing to cut up neighborhoods both poor and wealthy in the eye of progress.

While the tough reputation of Hell’s Kitchen on the west side just south of Lincoln Center is well-documented in the history of the Irish diaspora, the history of San Juan Hill was mostly erased by a single sweep of urban planning, by nature of simply no longer existing. As New York City expanded and industrialized, immigrant communities moved northwards. African Americans were also part of this movement, even pre-Civil War, along with their neighbors the Irish, Italians and Germans.

Originally, all groups were mixing and getting in trouble down in Five Points. Harlem’s reputation as the center of African American culture wouldn’t exist without the gradual northward movement of their community through the 1800s. After Five Points, the population moved into Greenwich Village, then to the Tenderloin in the streets between the 20s and 30s, then to Hell’s Kitchen. The area that’s now Lincoln Center was the logical next step, originally settled by the Dutch as an enclave by the name of Blooming Dale with its leafy aristocratic country homes.

Read the rest on 6sqft.

 

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