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Untapped Cities-Fort Totten-Anna BrownImage of Fort Totten Park Battery via Flickr by skingld

Every New Yorker should experience the standard Halloween parades in Greenwich Village and Central Park at least once (we supposed), but for those looking for something a little different this October, here are our top picks. And while we’re still awaiting news on whether our favorite event, the Cobble Hill pumpkin impalement by artist Jane Greengold is happening this year, there’s still a lot of alternative, off-the-beaten path activities to choose from.

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Image via Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao

Autumn is in full swing, and this week, we are excited for cocktail parties, parades, haunted houses, and much more!

Monday, October 13th

At 6:30 pm, The Greenwich Village Society for Historical Preservation is hosting authors and tour guides James and Michelle Nevius for a discussion regarding their latest book, Footprints in New York: Tracing the Lives of Four Centuries of New YorkersThe website describes that “in a talk illustrated with vintage photos and old maps, James and Michelle will focus on the stories in Footprints in New York that are connected to Greenwich Village, from Peter Stuyvesant’s bowery to Bob Dylan’s MacDougal Street.” Click here to register, and give yourself a bit of context for the talk by reading up on some of the quirks and histories of Greenwich Village.

Tuesday, October 14th

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Hotel Gilsey-Gilsey House-Tenderloin-Chelsea-Tin Pan Alley-NYC

Gilsey House 

On Sunday, October 19th at 4pm we’ll be hosting a walking tour with historian and author David Freeland through the remnants of the area of Manhattan once known as The Tenderloin. This area, which turned into the northern part of Chelsea, was home to New York City’s red light district, its dance clubs and gambling houses. Following the tour, we’ll be hosting an optional cocktail at the hidden speakeasy Bathtub Gin. In preparation for the event, we’ve interviewed David about what we’ll see on the tour and what some of his favorite Untapped finds are in the city.

Tell us about what the Tenderloin was like in its hey day and why it’s such an important part of NYC’s history

The Tenderloin peaked from the 1870s to the years just before 1910.  By 1910, it was essentially over.  The Tenderloin really could not have existed at any other time, and in few other places, within New York history.  Why?  It developed specifically as a shadowy outgrowth of the luxury hotel industry, which blossomed along Broadway and the upper 20s during the last decades of the 19th century–beginning with the opening of Gilsey House (where we will start our tour) in 1871.  Money flowed into the area, thanks to the influx of wealthy businessmen from the provinces–who came to New York with money to spend, and who were always looking for “after-hours” recreational opportunities!

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Bathtub Gin-Chelsea-Speakeasy-NYCImage via Bathtub Gin

On Sunday, October 19th we’ll be hosting a cocktail at the hidden speakeasy Bathtub Gin, located in the neighborhood that was once the Tenderloin in New York City’s west 20s. The Tenderloin was home to New York City’s brothels, dance clubs, and gambling houses. On this special event, historian David Freeland will first take us through a tour of the fascinating remains of the Tenderloin district and Tin Pan Alley, concluding with a cocktail at this period-inspired bar.

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The Public Theatre at Astor Place

October promises to be an exciting month for the New York City architecture world, as the festival Archtober begins October 1st. An initiative of The American Institute of Architects New York Chapter and the Center for Architecture Foundation based at 536 Laguardia Place in SoHo, this event will give the public the unique opportunity to attend more than 150 architecture and design lectures, conferences, programs, and exhibitions happening at the Center for Architecture and collaborating institutions across the city.

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Brooklyn Army Terminal-Myths-Balconies-Atrium-NYCImage by Andrew Gustafson

Last week, we began our series on the myths of the Brooklyn Army Terminal, letting you know where Elvis set foot on the premises (not where you think!) and clarifying the “abandoned” status of the building. Today, we’re continuing with another myth. Join us for our next tour of the magnificent building on Sunday, October 26th with Turnstile Tours. Tickets here.

1. What is up with those crazy balconies?

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