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This year’s Open House New York is coming up the weekend of October 11th and 12th–and we’re not the only ones getting excited for this year’s events at some of our favorite New York City locations. Every year, the country’s largest architecture and design event puts on an impressive number of great events to educate the public about architecture and design culture in NYC. Our favorite OHNY events are the tours of locations that are usually closed to the public and although not all have been announced quite yet, we’ve highlighted 16 locations so far that you should check out:

We know that some of our favorite locations are being reopened for OHNY tours this year. These include:

1. TWA Flight Center at JFK Airport

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Tours of architect Eero Saarinen’s rarely open TWA Flight Center will be given on Saturday, October 11th. Check it out before it gets converted into a hotel. See our interior photographs here.

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Earlier this year, we presented 8 combination coffee shops in New York City, ranging from record shop coffee shops to flower shop coffee shops and everything in between. Since then, we’ve come across a lot more combination joints where you can get a drink, sip a coffee or grab a slice of pizza, all while reveling in another fun activity ranging from board games, arcade games, video screening or even getting your hair cut.

1. Board Game Cafe: Uncommons

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Image via Not Just Geeks

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The Hudson Valley is full of incredible estates and historic houses. We have previously covered Kykuit: The Rockefellers’ Gilded Age Gem in the Hudson River Valley and The Ruins of Northgate, the Cornish Estate in the Hudson Valley. Presented below are close to thirty sites scattered throughout the Hudson Valley. They were home to artists, presidents, and robber barons and tell the story of the United States (and New York) from its humble Dutch origins through the Revolutionary War and well into the Victorian Era. These sites will keep you busy for years to come between attending guided tours and wandering around acres of idyllic landscapes.

1. Boscobel

638px-Boscobel_entrance_roadSource: Daniel Case Wikipedia

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The Interborough Rapid Transit of New York City opened its first subway line in 1904. 468 stations and 24 subway lines make up the tapestry of what we now know as the New York City Subway. Here is a list of those stations that stand out as unique in both their history and appearance. The original 28 subway stations had beautiful fare control houses designed by George Heins and Christopher LaFarge, some can still be seen at Atlantic Avenue, Bowling Green, 72nd Street and other spots. But as the subway expanded, subway station style evolved to adapt to Manhattan’s geography and evolving architectural and design styles. 

1. 190th Street at Overlook Terrace

190th Street - Overlook  Terrace- Untapped CitiesImage via Flickr by jag 9889

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There is something magical about finding a place in Central Park where you can look all around you and not see any buildings poking above the treetops. It’s as if you’ve found a portal in the middle of the country’s biggest city. Such spots are surprisingly rare because of how narrow Central Park is and the height of its surrounding buildings, but they can definitely be found. We’ve listed seven of our favorites below. If you know of any others, feel free to add them to the interactive map above or leave a comment on the post!

1. The Loch

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Just below the Pool is a charming little manmade waterfall that flows into the Loch, which winds its way northward through a ravine. The Lochs course presents multiple opportunities for building-less spots because of its low elevation and overhead vegetation. Apparently we weren’t the only ones who enjoyed the scenery; you can make out a man painting the landscape on the far right of the above panorama.

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Yesterday, we covered 10 buildings that refused to be demolished in the face of development. These spunky buildings (and the people who lived in or owned them, of course), make for some of the best New York City stories. Sometimes however, whole neighborhoods get lost in New York. Many have made way for some of New York City’s most famous neighborhoods, but today we’re highlighting some of the stories and people who once traversed the streets daily.

1. Radio Row, now World Trade Center

Radio-Row-World-Trade-Center-NYC-7Radio Row, which became the World Trade Center. Image via ArchRecord.

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