Paris Monoprix-Burial-150 Bodies-Supermarket-Grave-Trinity Hospital-France-5Image via Messy Nessy Chic

Parisians and Paris visitors may recognize this particular Monoprix, a Target-like chain in France, in the Marais neighborhood at Reaumur Sebastopol. But down underneath the aisles are over 150 bodies discovered only when the supermarket attempted to expand, as reported by 20 Minutes and Messy Nessy Chic. This location, on Boulevard de Sébastopol, was the location of The Trinity Hospital cemetery that operated between the 12th and 18th centuries. While the bodies in most burial locations in Paris were relocated to the Catacombs two centuries ago, these were left.


Paris-Metro Station Villiers-Storage Track-Abandoned Metro Subway Trains.36 AM

Parisian trainspotters have for years hoarded a special secret. It’s located next to the Metro Station Villiers in the 17th arrondissement, in a storage track that used to be a terminal loop for Metro Line 3 before it was extended. Inside, some very old trains lie dormant, their slumber undisturbed by regular visits by spray painters and photographers. Most of them are in an advanced state of decay.

Soon, this heritage will be gone, the trains will receive judgement: damned to dismantlement, or, for a select few deemed the most emblematic and unique, blessed with preservation. Take a tour with us today in this photo series taken over the course of two months from December 2014 to January 2015 of the abandoned trains, as well as a warehouse for restored metro cars.


Levalet-Charles Leval-Street Art Paris-001

By day, Charles Leval is an artist and teacher in Paris. In his spare time, he’s a street artist that goes by the name Levalet and has been adding some humor onto the streets of Paris since at least 2012. Often using objects already embedded into walls, his wheat paste works plays on the architecture of the streets themselves. While this style of work inevitably draws comparison to Banksy, he also institutes an almost still-life like method, perhaps from his training as an artist, by inserting found objects into his scenes from books, umbrellas, pool cues, wine glasses to even an electric piano. Others pieces have a time lapse nature to them.


Gustav Eiffel Apartment-Paris-Eiffel Tower-Vintage Photographs

We previously published about Gustav Eiffel’s fabulous apartment inside the Eiffel Tower, with a modern-day image but Messy Nessy just surfaced some vintage photographs of the shabby chic apartment where he entertained guests like Thomas Edison. The photographs were taken by the “Neurdein brothers” the official photographers of the 1889 World’s Fair in Paris. Here is a link to more of the images of the apartment which was on the fourt floor (285 meters above the ground, reads the caption).


Amadeus.net Beta Website-Untapped Cities-Sponsored Article-4

You may not have heard of Amadeus, but you’ve definitely used the company’s technology while searching for travel plans. Amadeus powers the booking engines of many of the world’s leading airlines and travel companies and now they’re providing these same technological tools directly to the consumer with the website Amadeus.net. Instead of the typical drop down search process, Amadeus lets you fill in the blanks with what you are looking for, just like writing a sentence. There are some neat tools, like semantic search, where you can fill in activities (like art, skiing or fooding), location and time of year and it will match with flight plans. It’s just in beta phase right now but there are hoping users like you can help test out the site.


The New Yorker-Charlie Hebdo-Paris-Eiffel Tower-Cover

Last night the New Yorker released its cover for next week’s issue in honor of the attacks at Charlie Hebdo in Paris. By Ana Juan, the illusration shows the Eiffel Tower as the symbolic pencil of journalists, tipped in red amidst a sandstorm of blood. Untapped Cities founder Michelle Young notes, “As a New Yorker, and a writer on Paris with a French husband and a French family now, I have to admit that this image really hit home. Maybe it was the similarity to the cloud of dust at Ground Zero–showing the vulnerability of a recognizable landmark as the symbol of a country’s pain emphasize the shared responsibility the global community has.”