Quantcast

The Interborough Rapid Transit of New York City opened its first subway line in 1904. 468 stations and 24 subway lines make up the tapestry of what we now know as the New York City Subway. Here is a list of those stations that stand out as unique in both their history and appearance. The original 28 subway stations had beautiful fare control houses designed by George Heins and Christopher LaFarge, some can still be seen at Atlantic Avenue, Bowling Green, 72nd Street and other spots. But as the subway expanded, subway station style evolved to adapt to Manhattan’s geography and evolving architectural and design styles. 

1. 190th Street at Overlook Terrace

190th Street - Overlook  Terrace- Untapped CitiesImage via Flickr by jag 9889

(more…)

Bushwick Aberdeen Subway Station - Anna Brown - Untapped Cities

New York City boasts 468 subway stations, and many more entrances. In the past, we have covered how businesses have creatively occupied stations to provide unexpected services like hair cuts, or having your keys made.

This week, we’re calling out the Bushwick Ave-Aberdeen Street stop off the L train. Usually, small businesses house their services within a station, but at this stop, the subway entrance itself is housed between two used car dealerships. The station was built in 1928, but the two plots around it were approved for automotive sales and services in 1946.

So why haven’t these car dealerships been cleared for trendy apartments and lofts like the rest of Bushwick? Perhaps because the Bushwick-Aberdeen train station is located in a region zoned as a C8-1 Commercial District. According to the Department of City Planning, these regions are designated for “commercial and manufacturing uses that often require large amounts of land.” Uses can include “automobile showrooms and repair shops, warehouses, gas stations and car washes.”

Bushwick Aberdeen Subway Station - Anna Brown - Untapped Cities 2

Right east of this zone lies a M1 Manufacturing District Zone, where the borders of Bushwick, East New York, and Bed Stuy meet at Broadway-Junction, a major subway hub that connects the A, J, C, and L trains. The M1 zone is designated for “light industrial uses, such as woodworking shops, repair shops, and wholesale service and storage facilities.” From the L train platform, you can view an example of this in the massive East New York Yard where the J, M, Z and L trains are stored and repaired.

East New York Yard - Flickr - Untapped CitiesEast New York Subway Yard, image via Flickr by OBI*ONES*KENOBI

Perhaps the surrounding area’s lack of residential opportunities explains why subway ridership at the Bushwick-Aberdeen Station ranked 403 out of 421 in 2013. Still, it can’t hurt to have a business near a train station that potential customers pass by every day. Perhaps these businesses have hopes that commuters can be lured into purchasing that 2007 Toyota Camry to forgo a crowded train ride to work. We’re not sure if even a car could compete with those high-speed aerial gondolas, though.

Check out our extensive coverage of the New York City subways, including the Top 12 Secrets of the NYC Subway and the 14 Beautiful Vintage Subway Entrances. h/t to Time Out NY for this find.

If you have any New York City subway finds, share them with Anna Brown via her Twitter handle @brooklynbonanza.

New York’s bohemian culture has always copped its fashion cues from the ample amount of thrift stores this city has to offer. But as time has gone on and rents dramatically increased, many thrift stores have transformed into “vintage shops,” where items of used clothing are handpicked and sold for high fashion prices. We love them too, as evidenced by our list of 25 Favorite Vintage Stores in NYC, but here is our list of New York City’s great “legitimate” thrift stores which will help you stay ahead of the curve and look good for way less. Happy shopping!

1. Atlantis Attic

atlantis attic-williamsburg-brooklyn-thrift store-vintage-nycImage via Yelp

Located on 771 Metropolitan Avenue, this Greenpoint thrift shop has a great selection of nearly everything. Notable among its collection is a huge amount of army apparel, which includes coats, jackets, and button downs of all sorts. Besides, where else in Brooklyn could you find a leather jacket for $20?

(more…)

Barcade-Beer-List-Untapped-Cities

We’ve already seen two of the more unusual themed bars: The Slaughtered Lamb in Greenwich Village and The Way Station in Prospect Heights, Brooklyn. Now, let’s look back at those two quirky bars, and we’ll show you two new ones in a roundup of some eccentric places to nerd out with some drinks.

(more…)

Here are our picks for the Best of the Untapped Cities Photo Pool: Bushwick Collective Block Party & Open Studios, which brought hordes of people to Bushwick last weekend to celebrate the street art scene. Remember, to have one of your photos entered in the running for a “Best Of” nod, just hastag your Instagram or Twitter urban exploration pictures #untappedcities. Keep an eye on what contributors and readers are checking out by browsing the live feed.

Vexta mural on Troutman Street by Christopher Inoa for @untappedcities

Untapped Cities Instagram pic of the week Vexta Bushwick Collective NYC

(more…)

Mural by Dasic.

Mural by Dasic.

Responsible for at least 30 of the freshest new murals in Bushwick is Exit Room, a wonderful gallery and cultural space. Located at 270 Meserole Street, (two blocks from the L train’s Montrose Ave. stop) Exit Room has been busy working on these murals in preparation for their first annual Juicy Art Festival.  This three-day art and music festival, running from June 5-7, is dedicated to bringing the arts and community together through street art, music, and performance.

(more…)