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Rockefeller University's Beaux Arts campus welcomed Dan Kiley's modernist vision.

Rockefeller University’s Beaux Arts campus welcomed Dan Kiley’s modernist vision.

Dan Kiley is the most eminent landscape architect you’ve never heard of—a “seminal landscape architect,” said the New York Times in its 2004 obituary, “who combined modernist functionalism with classical design principles in more than 1,000 projects.”

Or, as the Los-Angeles based architect Harry Wolf once commented, “There are plenty of good landscape architects. But there’s only one Dan Kiley, as there was only one Le Nôtre.”

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Raging Bull-Untapped Cities-NYC-Boxing.png (763×467) - Google Chrome 572015 92904 PMRaging Bull (Screenshot via Empire)

Quite a bit of time has now passed since the 2015 version of the the “Fight of The Century,” between Floyd Mayweather and Manny Pacquaio. Fans waited six years to see who would be considered the best boxer of their generation, paying up to $100 dollars to see the two clash. For many, it was a disappointment: another missed opportunity for boxing to truly capture the culture which seems to have slipped away. Before UFC, politics and the lack of true starpower, boxing has a proud and storied history that can rival any sport. A lot of great moments have happened here in New York City, where legends of the sport carved their name in history and battled with their fellow warriors for supremacy in the ring. To celebrate the sport of boxing, we have listed ten of the most important moments in NYC boxing history.
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Castello-Plan-New-Amsterdam-NYCThe Castello Plan of New Amsterdam, via Wikimedia Commons

On May 4, 1626, Peter Minuit arrived in New Amsterdam as the new director from the Dutch West India Company. Minuit was in his early 30s, and had been sent to diversify the trade coming out of New Netherland, then almost exclusively animal pelts. Minuit means “midnight” in Dutch, so if you prefer to think of Manhattan’s purchaser as “Peter Midnight,” go for it. (more…)

PragueCharlesBridgeRossPerkel

We’re bringing our international (read: non-New York City) coverage back into the mix. Our off-the-beaten path guides have included Rome and San Diego. Next up: Prague.

When you first land in Prague, the capital of the Czech Republic, you may be momentarily disconcerted by the flurry of above ground trams or the beer being the same price as water, but there are amazing secret places just waiting to be found all throughout the city.

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Whitlock's Folly, also known as the Casanova MansionWhitlock’s Folly, also known as the Casanova Mansion. Photo via Museum of the City of New York. 

Hunts Point, a well known neighborhood on the Southeastern tip of the Bronx, has become known as a major hub for food distribution, housing one of the largest wholesale food markets in the world. However, many forget that the neighborhood housed what was regarded as one of the finest private residences in America, a lost mansion now known as Whitlock’s Folly.

Formerly located at Oak Point on the Long Island Sound, the mansion was constructed in 1859 by a wealthy southerner named Benjamin Morris Whitlock. A sprawling fifty acre estate complete with one hundred rooms, the mansion was said to have cost around $350,000, equivalent to roughly $10 million dollars in 2012 money. Thanks to a tip and slideshow by Untapped reader Paul DeRienzo, we’re able to share with you some great information about this mansion, once called haunted by local kids in the Bronx.

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10004337005_6452cfbc04_zA vintage double decker bus of the Fifth Avenue Coach Company. Image Source: Flickr.com by the MTA

Fifth Avenue has it all: opulent retail, national embassies, corporate headquarters–but no Subway line. Why is this? Not only is there no line now (and no plans for one in the future), but no elevated trains or trolleys have ever operated on one of the world’s grandest thoroughfares. In fact, the avenue’s transit history is one of the most complex of any street in New York City. (more…)