Macy's Fireworks over the East River on Friday, July 4, 2014. Credit: Diana Robinson/Mayoral Photography OfficePhoto via Flickr|Diana Robinson

The famous Macy’s 4th of July fireworks will be celebrating their 40th anniversary this year. The display will begin around 9 pm (after dark) on the East River, making them the most visible from Queens, Brooklyn and Manhattan. Even though fireworks will be displayed over the East River, residents of the Bronx, Staten Island and Jersey City shouldn’t be alarmed, as they will still have access to local Independence Day celebrations. So if you’re staying in or around New York City this July 4th, have no fear. There are still plenty of ways to get a clear view of the sky.


Paparazzi Dogs Dumbo Untapped Cities AFineLyneThe Paparazzi Dogs in Dumbo

The month of June brings to New York City more than a dozen new outdoor art installations on top of a plethora still on view from last month. June will have you swinging at Brookfield Place, sliding on Governors Island, typing your thoughts, and examining your brain waves for your most inner thoughts. You can park-hop from Randall’s Island to Foley Square, from Prospect Park to Riverside Park, and your art-walk will take you from Coney Island to Harlem with many stops in between.

Here are thirteen art installations not to miss in New York City this June:


Keyword (Floating Bar)-Frying Pan-NYC-Untapped CitiesThe Frying Pan with Pier 66 Maritime Bar & Grill. Photo via Frying Pan

More than just places to gather and imbibe, many of New York City’s floating bars have a great history as well. So if the sea calls to you like it does to a titanic number of New Yorkers, don’t worry, you’re not too late. You can still get your nautical fill at any of these ten floating bars around New York City.


Patti Smith Robert Mapplethorpe-Untapped CitiesSource: Dangerous Minds.

A little over forty years ago, in a nightclub called Max’s Kansas City, Robert Mapplethorpe made his way through a crowd of artists, drag queens, and cocaine fiends, hoping to charm his way into Andy Warhol’s inner circle. His friend and ex-lover Patti Smith, then an unknown like him, watched his efforts warily. A few years later, Mapplethorpe would be shocking the art world with his provocative homoerotic photography and portraits of Warhol. Smith would be performing at Max’s. But before they achieved fame, they were vagrants moving through the world of artists, socialites, and provocateurs in downtown Manhattan. After Mapplethorpe lost his battle with AIDS in 1989, Patti Smith captured their experiences in her award-winning memoir Just Kids.

In this article, we’ll trace Patti Smith’s trail through New York City. Max’s, once a focal point of Warhol’s Factory, is gone now. There is a CVS at the address it once had north of Union Square. But other places are still here or remembered in film.


Mastodon fossil Untapped Cities

Some people might say New York City has a hard time holding on to its past, and it’s not just classic architecture and cool dive bars that disappear without a trace. Fossils, too, are easily lost beneath the city streets. Thousands of years ago, prehistoric animals roamed the area, including the mighty mastodon (Mammut americanum), an ancient animal with an outsized presence and huge historical significance.  (more…)

DSC08592Image via Flickr by Lucas

Who doesn’t love a fairy tale? Even pragmatic New Yorkers could not resist referencing the architecture of European nobility in the earlier days of the city. While many country mansions and manor homes outside of the city have a more overt reference to castle architecture, here in New York City there’s quite enough fairy dust to keep us curiously looking for more castles in our daily commute.