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Rockefeller University's Beaux Arts campus welcomed Dan Kiley's modernist vision.

Rockefeller University’s Beaux Arts campus welcomed Dan Kiley’s modernist vision.

Dan Kiley is the most eminent landscape architect you’ve never heard of—a “seminal landscape architect,” said the New York Times in its 2004 obituary, “who combined modernist functionalism with classical design principles in more than 1,000 projects.”

Or, as the Los-Angeles based architect Harry Wolf once commented, “There are plenty of good landscape architects. But there’s only one Dan Kiley, as there was only one Le Nôtre.”

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JR Flatiron Pasting-Giant Man Walking-NYCCover of The New York Times Magazine (photo via Jake Silverstein)

French street artist JR, whose work has previously been shown in Times Square, Fordham University and inside abandoned hospitals on Ellis Island, always seems to outdo himself when he comes to New York City. Last week, The New York Times Magazine released the April issue, titled “Walking New York.” The cover is an aerial photo of the very large and very real piece by JR at Flatiron Plaza, with information that there were many more placed throughout the five boroughs. There could be no better cue for us at Untapped Cities to go traipsing around the city this weekend.

All 14 of the other pieces were also photographs of recent immigrants, taken by JR on the streets of Nolita earlier this month. The goal is to encourage people to walk all over the city to find the pieces. Below are all 14 pieces of JR’s “Walking New York” project:

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Economy Candy, the Oldest Candy Store In New York CityEconomy Candy, NYC’s Oldest Candy Store

From its blue colored sign to its trademark image of a kid surrounded by morsels of sugary sweets, one might think Economy Candy store was erected from the remnants of a Willy Wonka movie. In truth, its origins are much older. At 78 years old, Economy Candy is actually the oldest candy store in New York City. The Lower East Side shop was founded by Morris “Moishe” Cohen, who passed away in February at the age if 97, in 1937 during the later years of the Great Depression. Despite its name, Economy Candy was originally a shoe store that sold candy to its patrons. As the economic downturn persisted, with families scrimping on uneccessary fashion purchases, Cohen found that candy continued to be that little guilty purchase. Today, staying true to its diversified roots, Economy Candy offers more than just candy, selling childhood mementos and memorabilia.

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Fordham-armory-untapped-nycArmory Hall at Fordham University. Image via Fordham.edu

New York City’s historic armories can be seen all around the city, and are currently used for all kinds of purposes in addition to some that retain their original function. They were built between the 18th and 20th centuries for New York State volunteer militia, serving as storage of arms and housing. These monumental fortresses were meant to remind the public of the military’s might and ability to maintain domestic law. Thankfully for us, the militia took great care in designing their fortresses and we have been left with remarkable armories that remind us of an important time in our city’s history. Some still function as National Guard posts, but many have been repurposed since the mid 20th century.

Here is a list of the remaining armories in the five boroughs of New York City.

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The UWS has restaurant rows on Broadway, Amsterdam, and Columbus.

The UWS has restaurant rows on Broadway, Amsterdam, and Columbus.

The food desert that characterized the Upper West Side restaurant scene for much of its history has been replanted over the last few years with with an amazing array of options. These days you can find most any cuisine and at almost any price level. One result is that restaurants are often packed—on a beautiful evening it’s possible to walk the length of Amsterdam Avenue, for example, coming back up Broadway or Columbus Avenue while spotting nary a single empty table.

We lay out a few of our favorites here, even as we mourn the many that have closed since the last time we did this, with our guide to Eating Well on the Upper West Side of Manhattan: 10 Moderately Priced Restaurants. But know that there are many more. If you get turned away from one, just head next door. We start at the northern fringe at Manhattanville, head through Morningside Heights and down to Columbus Circle, taking an expansive definition of the Upper West Side.

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Veteran-Korean-War-Battery-Park-NYC-Untapped Cities-Nasha Virata

At 10am on July 27th, a sundial in Battery Park will pay tribute to the veterans of the Korean War. The Korean War Veterans Memorial, also a sundial, commemorates the official ceasefire declared at that exact time and date in 1953. A functioning sundial, the piece is filled as the sun shines straight down the center of “The Universal Soldier,” illuminating the plaque located at the foot of the statue.

Designed by Welsh artist, Mac Adams, the memorial sits slightly north-west of Fritz Koenig’s “Sphere“, a tribute to 9/11. The 15-foot obelisk of black granite contains a cutout in the shape of a Korean War soldier lit up by the sun and offering views of both the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island

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