alley-pond-park-queens-nyc-untapped-citiesPhoto via NYC Parks

As a consequence of city-living, locals become accustomed to crowded subway cars and the constant lack of personal space. The congested nature of New York City is enough to turn any person into a grumpy urbanite, but spacious green space does exist if you know where to look.

Alley Pond Park, spanning over 655 acres, is one such refuge. As the second largest park in Queens, it provides enough breathing room for city-folk to freely stretch their arms without accidentally ramming their fists into adjacent bystanders. What more could someone ask for?


Three million people have been buried in New York City’s Calvary Cemetery since its establishment in 1848. Spanning 365 acres across Maspeth and Woodside, the visually famous site contains the largest number burials of any cemetery in the United States. New York City’s famous skyline, jaggedly rising and falling in the background, eerily parallels the lines formed by the endless
 rows of headstones decorating the grounds. Both elements are crowded, but organized – and perhaps those qualities are what make the Calvary Cemetery so intrinsic to city it was founded upon – and so picturesque for the countless movie and television series that have been filmed there. No wonder it never fails to pique our interest.


NY State Pavilion-Ideas Competition-National Trust for Historic Preservation-Queens-Hanging Meadows-Aidan Doyle-Sarah Wan-NYC-3Hanging Meadows by Aidan Doyle and Sarah Wan

In March, we announced that the National Trust for Historic Preservation would run a competition to reimagine the New York State Pavilion in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, designed by architect Philip Johnson for the 1964 World’s Fair. The site, an iconic landmark along Grand Central Parkway, has been a popular site for urban explorers (as seen in photographs of the crumbling towers and of the pavilion itself). Steady community activism, including a documentary film has led to numerous local and national government initiatives over the past few years and the site has been opened up on occasion to the public.

Yesterday at the Queens Museum, the winners of the National Trust competition were announced and the designs will be on exhibit inside the museum until August 28th. The competition was meant to be visionary, to inspire in the public and government officials the possibilities of what the New York State Pavilion could become in the 21st century.


Ellis Island. Image via Save Ellis Island.

From its start, New York City has been mired in territorial disputes. The Native Americans, the Dutch, the British, New Jerseyans, and even New Yorkers have all fought against one another, and themselves, for control of the land that comprises New York City. In some ways, border disputes are still on-going today, with less bloodshed, over the naming and boundaries of neighborhoods. Going back in time, here are eight territorial disputes that have affected New York City, waged between countries, states, cities, boroughs, and more.


Macy's Fireworks over the East River on Friday, July 4, 2014. Credit: Diana Robinson/Mayoral Photography OfficePhoto via Flickr|Diana Robinson

The famous Macy’s 4th of July fireworks will be celebrating their 40th anniversary this year. The display will begin around 9 pm (after dark) on the East River, making them the most visible from Queens, Brooklyn and Manhattan. Even though fireworks will be displayed over the East River, residents of the Bronx, Staten Island and Jersey City shouldn’t be alarmed, as they will still have access to local Independence Day celebrations. So if you’re staying in or around New York City this July 4th, have no fear. There are still plenty of ways to get a clear view of the sky.


No Longer Empty-Jameco Exchange-Jamaica-QueensPhoto courtesy of No Longer Empty/Whitney Browne

In an old storefront on 165th Street in Jamaica, Queens, is an unobtrusive art exhibition in a sea of clothing stores and food carts. Passersby stand in front of the clear glass doors, while expressions of confusion and amusement cross their faces as they try to decipher the colorful installations within. Inside the four walls of the repurposed building is Jameco Exchange, a site-specific art exhibit that celebrates the rich history and diversity of Jamaica.