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Day Glo Map-Steven Van Worley-NYC Street Grid-001

Artist and scientist Stephen Von Worley made these incredible “day glo” maps of a handful of the world’s major cities ostensibly to understand in his own words, “what other treasures I had missed.” The result from a data visualization standpoint is to give us an idea of how gridded a city is. A basic rundown of how these beautiful maps work: the roads that are oriented in the same direction have the same color. The thicker the lines, the more “grid-like” the area is.

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Manahatta-Map-Eric Sanderson-Markley Bower-NYC

You probably remember this image from 2009 but we thought we’d bring back the TED Talk that explains how landscape ecologist Eric Sanderson and illustrator Markley Boyer recreated what Manhattan looked like when English explorer Henry Hudson arrived in 1609. They used a British military map from 1776 to visualize the what existed on the island the Lenape called called Mannahatta. In order to deduce which ecosystems existed on the island pre-1609, Sanderson isolated the geographical elements from the 1776 map, studied the types of soil, rock, and climate of the different regions, and from there, the species of animal, fish, and plant life that corresponded to each habitat.

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We’re always on the look out for fun maps of NYC and we came across this site recently, NYC Roads by Steve Anderson. It looks like it was laid out in the 1990s but it does have a nice archive of road maps, vintage photographs and more. The road map database goes from 1928 to the 1990s. Here are some highlights:

1928 New York and Vicinity Rand McNally Map

This 1928 road map of NYC and vicinity shows the state of the roads. Paved in black, improved in dash line and graded or dirt roads in white:

1928 NYC Regional Map-Rand McNally

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anna brown screen capture mapsImage via Business Insider

 

Imagine this: You walk out of Port Authority after a long bus trip, and need to find your best friend’s apartment at 383 Madison Avenue. As you take your phone out of your pocket, a commuter with no patience for dawdlers rushes past you, bumping your arm, causing your phone to fall and smash into smithereens on the sidewalk. So what do you do? Luckily, there’s a mathematical formula that will help you estimate the cross street of any address in Manhattan, and all it requires is a bit of mental math.

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UES-literary map-annabrown-untapped citiesImage via Warby Parker

To celebrate the opening of its new location at East 82nd Street and Lexington Avenue, the eyewear company Warby Parker has released an Upper East Side Literary Map and Tour that pairs classic New York authors, stories, and places to their physical locations.

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If you’re a New Yorker who has ever complained about living far from the subway, we have news that will hopefully reassure you: there is someone who lives farther from a subway stop than you do. That is, of course, unless you’re that person. I Quant NY has quantifiably found the apartment farthest from a subway line in both Manhattan and Brooklyn. To obtain this data, the MTA Subway Station Entrance data set was combined with information on plots of land in NYC from PLUTO, an open data source also recently utilized in this fun map of building footprints in New York City. The distance from each lot to the nearest subway station was then found and measured against the rest.

apartments-farthest-from-subway-manhattan-untappedImage via Tumblr: I Quant NY

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