1. There’s an Abandoned Subway Station Below City Hall

Opened in 1904, the old City Hall station with its beautiful architecture and curved platform was intended to be a showpiece of the Interborough Rapid Transit Company’s (IRT) new subway line. It was also the chosen place for hanging the commemorative plaques dedicated to those who designed, built and financed the underground train system. Contrary to popular belief, there was no plaque here honoring Alfred Ely Beach’s early pneumatic subway.

The station was closed just a few decades later in 1945 because its curved platform wasn’t able to accommodate the IRT’s newer, longer cars. Today, the subway stop still remains closed but you can get a quick glimpse of the platform by taking the 6 train past its last stop at Brooklyn Bridge. The stained glass windows, blacked out during World War II, can also be seen from the grounds of City Hall Park. For those who want a full-blown tour, you can become a member of the MTA Transit Museum to access the City Hall station.

Read about 10 fun facts from opening day of the NYC subway.