Bonus: It Has Some Really Picturesque 1920s Architecture

2-Secrets of Turtle Bay_engraving_Beekman Place_51st street_NYC_Untapped Cities_Stephanie GeierAn engraving on a building on Beekman Place and 51st street

Walking around the portion of Turtle Bay closest to the East River almost feels like a different world: peaceful, uncrowded, and filled with brownstones and smaller brick buildings rather than skyscrapers. Much of the residential architecture is from the 1920s, often featuring basic Italian antecedents, stucco walls again bricks or tile. But what stands out the most are the intriguing figurines decorating some of the buildings, especially these ones on 51st street.

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Now check out the Top 10 Secrets of the United NationsCities 101: The Evolution of NYC’s Neighborhood Names, and 6 NYC Homes of the United Nations. Get in touch with the author @sgeier97