1. The Concord Resort Hotel

The remains of the Concord Resort Hotel. Photo by Marisa Scheinfeld from The Borscht Belt: Revisiting the Remains of America’s Jewish Vacationland.

The Concord Resort Hotel, which was known as the largest resort in the Borscht Belt region, was located in Kiamesha Lake, New York. The Concord was a main competitor of Grossinger’s, expanding substantially in the 1950s to establish its signature entertainment venues, including the Cordillion Room, The Constellation Room, and the Imperial Room, which hosted comedians Jackie Mason and Buddy Hackett. The Concord Resort Hotel stayed functioning until 1998, when it was forced to close due to bankruptcy. [Update: a new complex has been built on the site – Resorts World Casino Catskills and can be seen as a filming location for the Showtime series, Billions.]

Today, the remains of the Borscht Belt resorts sit abandoned. Most hotels and establishments closed their doors in the 1980’s and 90’s, and the once heavily-inhabited structures now lie in a state of decay. Many remain abandoned and for sale, allowing anyone who wishes to venture through the buildings and photograph them.

In recent years, efforts have been made to establish a casino resort at the Borscht Belt, while other hope to return the resort, particularly Grossinger’s, to its former glory. For now, the resort at its peak of popularity still remains a distant memory as it continues to lay deserted and defaced in the Catskills.

Get the book, The Borscht Belt: Revisiting the Remains of America’s Jewish Vacationland.

For more abandoned locales throughout New York, check out 9 Abandoned Buildings in Upstate NY’s Lake George Region and Photos: Inside NYC’s Abandoned Fort Wadsworth on Staten Island.

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3 Responses
  1. Alan I Fleischmann Reply

    Fond memories of the Grossinger’s and other Catskills resorts. I spent 2 years (1971-1973) attending Sullivan County Community College. Originally at the old South Fallsburg, then at their brand new campus in Loch Sheldrake in 1973.
    As a Jewish kid from Long Island (of course born in Brooklyn) I always felt at home the resort area, working weekends at many of the resorts. I was a bus boy, car hop, bell hop, and staff photographer for Earl “the Pearl” Tunick. As one of Earl’s army of photographers, I took photos at dinner and cocktail parties at The Concord, the Pines, The Raleigh, The Brickman, The Gibber, The Granit 2, the Nevele, the Fallsview, The Flagler (whose owner, Milt Brizel, was my Math professor) The Gilbert, Kutschers, Grossingers, and many others. I lived for a semester at the Olympic, the Evans, and in an apartment in nearby Hurlyville. These were among the most memorable two years of my life. My parents and grandparents always had stories of their childhoods in the Catskills, from the old Summit House in South Fallsburg, to Finkelsteins Foibles (between Hurleyville and Loch Sheldrake. While at Sullivan Community College, I had Manny Wakefield (author of “To The Mountains By Rail-History of the O&W) as one of my professors. Crazy and memorable characters like Morty Cherlin (the Evans), Bob Rosenburg (The Olympic), Max Kahn, Lebel Wirschinsky, Dave Tractenburg, and many others will forever have a place in my memories….. Truly fond memories. I had the opportunity to tour the county on a recent road trip, and came away truly depressed at the dilapidated condition of the county. I DO have the memories!

  2. Simon DelMonte Reply

    Such an incredible melancholy to see these hotels just sitting there. Surely someone out there wants the land, if nothing else. But as much the weather up there is still cooler in the summer and the scenery is still lush, it seems that no one wants to go to a resort in the Catskills for any reason now.

    I was at the Homowack for a singles event in 1992, and around the same time my future wife went there for a family get-together, so it was not that long ago that the place was getting business. But by 1992, the grounds were leaning toward decrepit, the rooms were antiquated, and the overall effect was enough to make me never go there again (though I did get to see the late, great comedian Dennis Wolfberg, who lamented having an agent who booked him there for July 4th).

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