Timothy Schenck/Courtesy of the High Line

The renovation of the High Line, the formerly abandoned elevated rail track on the west side of Manhattan, has been an ongoing project which has been in progress since the 1990s. This year, with the opening of The Spur on June 5th, the last remaining section of the original rail structure will be opened to the public. Join Untapped Cities Insiders for two early access tours of the new section of the park led by the cofounder and executive director of Friends of the High Line, Robert Hammond on May 6th and May 14th. Not an Insider yet? Become a member today to gain access to behind-the-scenes tours and events all year long!

Timothy Schenck/Courtesy of the High Line

Though the Spur at 30th Street and 10th Avenue is the smallest stretch of the High Line Park, it boasts many new features including the widest space in the park, a unique location for large-scale art installations (of which one is already on display), and the biggest planting beds in the park. The Spur consist of three distinct parts designed by James Corner Field Operations (Project Lead) and Diller Scofidio + Renfro with landscaping by planting designer Piet Oudolf, the same team responsible for the design of the first three sections of the High Line. The first phase of the Spur is the Coach Passage, a planted threshold and a large open piazza which crosses through Coach’s global headquarters at 10 Hudson Yards. At the passage, a series of planted balconies stretch out from under the building to offer views of the sky, surrounding buildings, and the other sections of the High Line over 30th Street.

Timothy Schenck/Courtesy of the High Line

After walking through the Coach Passage, visitors will come upon two large tilted planters. The landscaping on the Spur was inspired by the natural, wild growth that sprung up at the tracks when the High Line was abandoned. In this section of the park alone, there are 8,500 perennials and 69 trees and shrubs. The giant planters lead into the open piazza where you can take in panoramic views up and down 10th Avenue and 30th Street. The piazza is where you will find the historic rail tracks that once led to the USPS Morgan Processing and Distribution Center and it is the widest part of the park. With large wooden step seating and open space, the piazza will be used as a gathering space to host High Line programming and performances.

Timothy Schenck/Courtesy of the High Line

Other features of the new section of the park include the High Line Shop, new restrooms, and the Plinth. The Plinth is a dedicated site for a rotation of monumental artworks curated by High Line Art. The first installation to grace the new space is Simone Leigh’s Brick House, which can currently be seen from 10th Avenue. When the Spur opens in June the 16-foot-tall bronze bust will be able to be viewed in the round.

Simone Leigh, Brick House, 2019. A High Line Plinth commission. On view June 2019 – September 2020. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy the High Line

The Spur will open to the public on Wednesday, June 5th, but if you are an Untapped Cities Insider, you can join us for two early access tours of the new section of the park led by the cofounder and executive director of Friends of the High Line, Robert Hammond. These free tours will take place on May 7th and May 14th, before the park is open to the public. Learn more and register for your spot here! Not an Insider yet? Become a member today to gain access to behind-the-scenes tours and events all year long!

Timothy Schenck/Courtesy of the High Line

Diller Scofidio + Renfro/Courtesy of the High Line

Diller Scofidio + Renfro/Courtesy of the High Line

Diller Scofidio + Renfro/Courtesy of the High Line

Next, check out The Top 10 Secrets Of The High Line in NYC and see out full list of upcoming Insider events!

 

 Behind the Scenes, high line, manhattan, the spur, Untapped Cities Insiders

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *