7. Tour the Mets Hall of Fame and Museum

The Hall of Fame and Museum is free to enter and is full of articles from throughout the team’s history.

Tucked away next to the Mets Team Store in the Jackie Robinson Rotunda sits the Mets Hall of Fame and Museum. According to an Untapped Cities reader and former and former associate editor the Mets’ in-house magazine Inside Pitch, the Mets Hall of Fame “was only added AFTER Met fans complained that Citi Field was basically a tribute to the Brooklyn Dodgers, and had nothing in that honored the home team.”

The museum is open to any and all guests before, during, and shortly after the game and does not require an extra ticket or pass to enter. The museum hosts many different and notable Mets artifacts like the original Mr. Met costume, trophies and memorabilia from the 1969 and 1986 World Series, and the aforementioned Shea Stadium Field level seats.

The Hall of Fame portion of the museum consists of game-worn jerseys, newspaper and video highlights, and plaques dedicated to each of the players. If you’re looking to visit when the team isn’t home, Citi Field offers tours that give guests an in depth look at many different parts of the stadium that are off limits during game time. On your next visit, be sure to stop in to take a stroll through the Mets’ history.

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One Response
  1. Kiwiwriter Reply

    The Mets Hall of Fame and Museum gave this Yankee fan a good laugh…it was only added AFTER Met fans complained that CitiField was basically a tribute to the Brooklyn Dodgers, and had nothing in that honored the home team. Thus, it gave the Dodgers TWO home stadiums.

    An embarrassed Met owner Jeff Wilpon dusted off the plaques of the long moribund Met Hall of Fame and added a few new victims — I mean honorees — and created the Mets Museum.

    First time I went to CitiField, I scrutinized the plaques and cracked up at the sight of Tug McGraw’s having a misspelled word. If I’d done that when I was associate editor their house magazine “Inside Pitch,” back in the 1980s (they fired me on when they sold the paper to “Baseball America” in 1985, another reason why I don’t root for the Mets any more), I would have been flogged as pre-game entertainment.

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