vintage Typewriter in the Bankers Club at the Equitable BuildingRemington vintage Typewriter in the Bankers Club at the Equitable BuildingSmith-Corona vintage Typewriter in the Bankers Club at the Equitable BuildingUnderwood vintage Typewriter in the Bankers Club at the Equitable BuildingRemington vintage Typewriter in the Bankers Club at the Equitable BuildingUnderwood vintage Typewriter in the Bankers Club at the Equitable BuildingVintage cash register at the Equitable Buildingvintage Typewriter in the Bankers Club at theEquitable Building

One of the highlights of the Equitable Building’s recent extensive restoration, including a rehabilitated lobby, street art mecca, and new rooftop lounge, is the display of vintage typewriters inside the Bankers Club on the 40th floor. This space, formerly an exclusive private dining location has been opened up to building employees and features a coffee bar and restaurant. It’s a gorgeous, light-filled space with a variety of seating to work or eat lunch from or have meetings, including tables, countertops, and couches.

Bankers Club at the Equitable Building

History lovers will particularly appreciate the collection of vintage typewriters which sit on the windowsills, including Underwood, Remington, Royal, and Smith-Corona models. They’re placed right above the countertop seats that wrap around the Bankers Club, which once hosted guests like Queen Elizabeth II and Winston Churchill. There’s even a vintage cash register atop the coffee bar.  And you’ll be sitting in the very building that inspired the creation of the first zoning code for New York City (which aimed to prevent other buildings of its scale to be built).

The Equitable Building restoration was performed by Beyer Blinder Belle Architects and Planners (who also have offices in the Equitable Building) and financed by Silverstein Properties. If you’re wondering how to visit, you’ll need to either have a meeting in the building (some firms and organizations inside besides Beyer Blinder Belle include the New York City Department of City Planning, Macmillan, Handel Architects, and New York Life) or attend a private event in the Bankers Club which happen on occasion.

For more typewriter fun, you can also find a large collection of vintage typewriters inside the CUNY Journalism school building and you can step inside one of the last typewriter stores in New York City. 

3 thoughts on “Vintage Typewriters Abound in the Bankers Club Atop the Equitable Building

  1. That Underwood is a No. 5 from 1895.

    Despite its age and weight, it is STILL a very good manual typewriter. As recently as 1980, I used them to write term papers for high school. They took ordinary modern typewriter ribbons.

      1. I know this because my father was the leading historian on American antique typewriters — wrote and published the definitive book on the subject. I grew up in an apartment that had nearly 100 of them. He would restore them to working order, which accounts for his Fox and my Underwood.

        When I was four years old, Dad said, “Dave, if you want to do anything in life besides push racks of clothes up and down Seventh Avenue, you will work in an office. That means you will have to type. So today, you will learn how to type.”

        So I did. By the time I hit adulthood, I could type at 110 words per minute, and still can. I compose my writing at the keyboard, thoughts going directly from brain to fingers. With the additional training and education I’ve had that got me my MFA in Creative Writing, the process is easier — yet harder — than ever.

        I’ve had a lot of literary, professional, and journalism mentors, but it all comes back to Dad. Like the song goes:

        The leader of the band is tired and his eyes are growing old
        But his blood runs through my instrument and his song is in my soul
        My life has been a poor attempt to imitate the man
        I’m just a living legacy to the leader of the band
        I am the living legacy to the leader of the band

        He died in 1995. Five days after my wedding.

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