The MTA has released its first photos of the new R211 class subways that will be coming to the New York City transit system on the lettered lines and the Staten Island Railway. An open gangway, which will allow passengers to cross between cars without opening doors, is among the numerous new innovations in the R211.

Open gangway in R211 subway carPhoto courtesy MTA

In 2017, the MTA previewed a prototype of the cars at Hudson Yards and this is the first look at the cars in production. According to the MTA, “the move toward a first-in-class subway car is critically necessary and an essential part of modernizing our subway system.” The open gangway will have accordion-like walls, similar to those on articulated buses you have likely been on, and help reduce crowding by better distributing passengers more evenly on a train.

R211 subway car in shopPhoto courtesy MTA

Front of R211 subway carPhoto courtesy MTA

The doors will be eight inches wider than standard doors today reaching a span of 58 inches, which is intended to speed boarding and reduce delays. New double-poles, which have been rolled out on some subway cars already, will be standard in the R211. There will also be brighter lights and digital displays with real-time information about train service and stations.

Interior of R211 subway carPhoto courtesy MTA

The 535 R211 cars are being made by Kawaksaki Rail Car. Inc at a cost of $1.4 billion and the first thirty test cars are anticipated to arrive later this year.

Join us on our next underground tour of the NYC subway:

Header photo courtesy MTA.

4 thoughts on “Get a First Look at the New Open Gangway Subways Coming to NYC

  1. Jodd
    I would append a “:)” were it not that your comment, given the city’s approach to the homeless on streets and trains, is plausibly closer to the truth.

  2. Despite the MTA’s usual way of hyping things to make them seem greater than they are, this is not a “new innovation”. BMT D-Type Triplex cars did not have doors between each set of cars. They were also articulated, allowing passengers to readily pass between the cars.

  3. I hate to say it, but my first thought was that the blue tarps were sleeping bags with homeless people. And the MTA wanted to show what the cars would be like in actual service.

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