St. Mark’s Church in the Bowery is the oldest site of continuous worship in New York City and the second oldest church in Manhattan, but in the 1920s Frank Lloyd Wright was commissioned to design three high-rise apartment towers to rise over the grave of Peter Stuyvesant. Fortunately the Great Depression got in the way and today, the church remains as it once was, but is  in need of some repairs which could be funded by your vote in  Partners in Preservation.  The church hopes to repair the 1858 James Bogardus designed  Portico and entry steps.

St. Mark’s preserves the city’s Dutch roots through it’s name, location, history, and relics. Peter Stuyvesant, the last Dutch governor of New Netherlands (before the English came and renamed the colony New York) lived in the vicinity of the church. His farm was named the bouwerij (Dutch for farm), which when Anglicized, became the Bowery. Governor Stuyvesant’s great-grandson, Petrus Stuyvesant, sold the chapel property to the Episcopal Church for one dollar and two years later, on April 25, 1795, the cornerstone of St. Mark’s Church was laid.

The church’s exterior and yard are equally as important as the church’s interior. In the West Yard sits the mechanism from the church’s  nineteenth-century clock which was damaged in a 1978 fire.  The two sculptures of American Indians, entitled  “Inspiration” and “Aspiration,” were  carved by sculptor Solon Borglum, the brother of the sculptor of Mt. Rushmore. They were acquired in the 1920s along with two lion sculptures by Rev. William Norman Guthrie, the same pastor who commissioned the Frank Lloyd Wright apartments.

A who’s who of nineteenth-century, and earlier, New Yorkers can be found interred in St. Mark’s courtyard. These famous New Yorkers included Peter Stuyvesant, A.T. Stewart, Nicholas Fish, Abraham Schermerhorn, Elizabeth Beekman, Daniel Tompkins and former mayors of New York City Philip Hone and Gideon Lee. A bust of  Stuyvesant in the churchyard was presented to St. Mark’s by Queen Wilhelmina of Holland and the Dutch Government in 1915.

St. Mark’s in the Bowery is a community institution with an international reputation. The church maintains a strong relationship with its historic roots while remaining engaged with its ever  changing  community. The church has hosted  Queen Julian, Princess Margriet, and Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands  while simultaneously serving as a center for the arts  supporting community groups and  renowned  artists.  W.H. Auden, William Carlos Williams and Allen Ginsberg have taken part in poetry readings at the church and Isadora Duncan and Martha Graham have danced there.  With your vote, St. Mark’s can continue serving its its diverse community for many years to come.

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Untapped Cities is an official blog ambassador for  Partners in Preservation  , a community-based initiative by  American Express  and the  National Trust for Historic Preservation  to raise awareness of the importance of historic places. For complete coverage, follow our  Partners in Preservation category.


  1. […] thanks that St. Mark’s Church in the Bowery has been able to keep the integrity of years gone by as long as it […]

  2. […] there is always Abe Lebewohl Park on 10th Street and 2nd Ave. The park resides in front of St. Mark’s Church in-the-Bowery, the second church to be built in Manhattan. The man who lends his name to the park, Abe Lebewohl, […]

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