NY Train Project. He first tackled Manhattan and then in 2015, completed all 157 stations Brooklyn. Now, he’s finished the Bronx. He tells Untapped Cities:

“Working on the Bronx stations was interesting. I honestly never really went out there too much, so I was seeing a lot of the stops for the first time. I wasn’t sure what type of signages I would see.  I knew a majority of the lines were above ground, but there was still some intricate ones that I came across. So far I’ve been able to launch a new borough each year for the past three years, and I’m looking forward to hopefully wrapping up the last borough, Queens, by the end of next year and completing NY Train Project.”

new-yorker-hotel-sign-art-deco-secrets-nycPhoto via Flickr by George Estreich

The New Yorker Hotel at 34th Street and 8th Avenue is one of those storied Manhattan icons – so much history and so many secrets, it’s hard to whittle them down. The Art Deco building, completed in 1930, is renown for its setback architectural style and famous sign but inside, you’ll discover something new on every visit. As a handy guide, we’re getting you started with ten of our favorite secrets that we learned while touring the hotel with Joe Kinney, senior project engineer at the New Yorker Hotel and creator of the archives and museum. He’s been on the hotel staff since 1996.

r179-subway-car-testing-207th-street-railyard-mta-2016Photo via New York Transit Museum

You know those old C trains with the ribbed metal pattern on the outside and gray seats on the inside? Often the air conditioning is broken and the cars make for a jerky ride. Well, the future is finally here in the form of the R179 train, long delayed and over budget. The first set of cars arrived for testing at the Overhaul Shop in the 207th Street Rail Yard in Inwood last week, as posted to Instagram by the New York Transit Museum. The first car, #3014 was delivered on September 6th.


New York Public Library Archive-1939 World's Fair-Flushing Meadows-Corona Park-NYC1939 World’s Fair. Photo via NYPL.

The 1939 World’s Fair was a hopeful moment amidst of sea of international political turmoil, just before the start of World War II. Its theme, “Building the World of Tomorrow,” encapsulated the scale and scope of what the organizers intended. It was the largest of any international fair that came before it, measured in terms of visitors, size, cost, and other factors, and featured the participation of not only countries (60 of them) but also international corporations like General Motors, Wonder Bread, IBM and more.

The remnants of the 1964 World’s Fair in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park are readily apparent, but those from the 1939 World’s Fair require quite a bit more digging. From 1964, the most notable holdouts include Philip Johnson’s New York State Pavilion (the subject of much controversy and rehabilitation efforts), the Unisphere, various buildings like the the space-age looking building, Terrace on the Park, and numerous sculptures.

Here are ten remnants from the 1939 World’s Fair, uncovered and researched on request by one of Untapped Cities’ readers!


A while back, we brought you a piece about the now extinct “Train to the Plane” on 1970s NYC Subway Maps. In the 70s, the city introduced the “JFK Express” or “Train to the Plane” as a premium fare charged ride with higher quality cars running from 57th Street and 6th Ave in Manhattan to the airport. Despite the extra comfort it offered, it was still slower than A train services. Today, this direct line no longer exists, instead you’d have to take the E to Jamaica or A to Howard Beach/JFK Airport and take the Airtrain from there.


NYC Transit Map Subway and Bus-4

It’s happened to all of us. That moment when you want to know what bus you can connect to, but it’s not on your subway map. In fact, you might have to download a whole separate app to get New York City’s bus map. Well, a Queens resident, Anthony Denaro, has created a master map that includes subways, bus, and AirTrain, called the Bullet Map (h/t Streetsblog).