Quantcast

Barretto Point Park-Hunts Point-The Bronx-Floating Pool-NYC-3Photo by Malcolm Pinckney via NYC Parks

Among New York City’s 520 miles of coastline and far from the hordes of people that crowd New York’s more popular beaches are a host of lesser known parks offering waterfront access, panoramic views, and even natural wildlife discovery. The city published a map of all of New York’s public waterfront space, but we’ve picked out some of the most interesting from each of the five boroughs. Check them out!

(more…)

+POOL-NYC-East-River-Filtering-Pool-Project

In honor of the warm weather (hopefully) dawning on the city soon, we thought we’d share a list of New York’s most notable swimming pools–from historically significant ones in ruins, a floating public pool in the works, to ones crowning five star hotels. What follows is a list of notable pools around the city.

1. Woolworth Building Pool

Woolworth Building-Pool-Pompeii-Wurts Brothers-Vintage Photo-NYCThe Woolworth Building‘s Pompeii inspired pool (photo via New-York Historical Society)

In the depths of the the Woolworth Building, one of New York’s most iconic landmarks, rests the remnants of a Pompeii-inspired pool. Covered extensively in our The New York City That Never Was column, the pool was designed by Woolworth Building architect Cass Gilbert and used until 1999 as part of the Jack Lalane health club. Today, it is undergoing renovation as part of the partial conversion of the Woolworth Building into luxury condominiums.

Check out our photos of the pool in its abandoned state, pre-renovation. Note our upcoming tour of the building, led by Cass Gilbert’s great granddaughter

(more…)

B-110 Bus Line Route-Hasidic Jewish Community-Private Transportation Company-Sex Segregation-Williamsburg-Sunset Park-Borough Park-NYC-3

Sure, the Chinese community in New York City has their dollar vans that run between neighborhoods like Chinatown, Sunset Park and Flushing. But the Hasidic Jewish neighborhoods take the ethnic-defined bus to a new level – the B-110 bus looks like a municipal bus (though the buses themselves come from the Fairfax Connector in Virginia) and operates under a franchise with the city.

The B-110 bus is operated by Private Transportation Corporation, which doesn’t take any subsidies from the city. The route goes from Williamsburg and Borough Park and by law, anyone can take it, but the buses are wrapped in Yiddish writing. It also costs more than an MTA fare at $3.25.

(more…)

becky howland-1979-123 Delancey-nyc-untapped citiesImage via Places Journal

Since the city began undergoing intense gentrification in the late 1970s, many artists have stepped up and to occupy and sometimes even reclaim places to both preserve the city’s history, but also to highlight the negative implications of gentrification, and showcase their unique artistry. The city is known for its heralded art museums, but to be showcased is a difficult feat in itself.

Take a look at 10 places in New York City that artists and musicians have occupied to showcase their skills, and preserve ideals of community building by fighting gentrification. (more…)

williamsburg bridge-nyc-untapped citiesImage via Wikimedia Commons

The Williamsburg Bridge is a suspension bridge in New York City over the East River, connecting Brooklyn’s Williamsburg area to the Lower East Side in Manhattan at Delancey Street, and was the second one built across the East River. Built in 1903, it was the longest suspension bridge in the world at the time at over 1000 feet long (a title previously held by the Brooklyn Bridge). Today it is one of the busiest carrying vehicles between the city’s two boroughs. Previously, we brought you 10 fun facts about the creation of the bridge, but there’s plenty of interesting history surrounding the structure upon its completion. So, we’ve compiled a list of the top 10 secrets of the Williamsburg Bridge. (more…)

Historian Discusses the Local History of Flavor at NYC's Museum of Food and Drink_Mofad_Nadia Berenstein_Williamsburg_Brooklyn_inside 17_Stephanie Geier_Untapped Cities

Did you know that European immigration helped the flavor manufacturing industry flourish in New York City? Or that Chelsea Market used to be the factory complex for the National Biscuit Company, where the Oreo was created? Historian Nadia Berenstein discussed all of this during her lecture at Making It Here: A Local History of Flavor, hosted by the new Museum of Food and Drink‘s Mofad Lab yesterday evening.

(more…)