Historical NYC App Shows Croton Aqueduct Stone Remnants in Upper Manhattan

Photo via Paul Kittas

We’ve previously covered the existing remnants of the Croton Aqueduct, the first to bring fresh drinking water into New York City. Paul Kittas, creator of the app On Coogan’s Bluff recently contacted us to share the discoveries he’s made in Washington Heights – stone retaining walls in High Bridge Park he believes were overlooked in maps by the Friends of the Croton Aqueduct. Kittas tells us, “In 1848, one hundred and sixty seven years ago, the Croton Aqueduct was built here and it looks the same as when the workers walked off the site.” He built the app to allow the curious how to “explore a remote section of Manhattan on your own.” The route takes one from 155th Street in Washington Heights to High Bridge Park

Kittas also shared with us cross section drawings he designed, which were drawn by artist JML:

Coogan's Bluff-Croton Aqueduct-High Bridge Park-Washington Heights-Manhattan-NYC

Coogans-Bluff-App-Croton-Aqueduct-High-Bridge-Park-Washington-Heights-Manhattan-NYC-5Screenshot from the app

Coogan's Bluff-Croton Aqueduct-High Bridge Park-Washington Heights-Manhattan-NYC-4Photo via Paul Kittas

Coogan's Bluff-Croton Aqueduct-High Bridge Park-Washington Heights-Manhattan-NYC-3Photo via Paul Kittas

Coogan's Bluff-Croton Aqueduct-High Bridge Park-Washington Heights-Manhattan-NYC-2

Next, read about other remnants of the Croton Aqueduct in New York City, the reopening of High Bridge and its water tower or the secrets of Fort Tryon Park.

 Croton Aqueduct, High Bridge, washington heights

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *