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One of New York City’s most beloved buildings is the Flatiron Building. Though never one of the tallest buildings in the city, it was nonetheless revolutionary in its own way due to its construction method. Here are some fun facts not commonly known about the iconic building.

10. There are Art Exhibitions in “The Prow” of The Flatiron Building

Flatiron Building-Edward Hopper-Nighthawks-Hopper Drawing-NYC-Whitney MuseumPhotograph by Filip Wolak via Whitney Museum Facebook Page

There are regular installations in the glass Flatiron Prow Art Space, sponsored by Sprint. In 2013, Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks was recreated there. Most recently, 50 steel helmets from the Vietnam War hung as part of Eyes on the Ground. Artist Hu Bing is now on display there.

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9 Comments

  1. Steve Richardson says:

    Good article. It has given my daughter some leads and a starting point for her end of year school project.

  2. What was the name of the French Restaurant ? Also young Irvin Berlin with Mitchell Band at the restaurant ?

  3. What was the name of the French restaurant ? Louies …and Irving Berlin with the Mitchell BAND RAG MUSIC from Harlem ?

  4. Howard D says:

    The bouncing characteristic of the elevators, exacerbated by a poorly trained operator who descended rapidly, then reversed direction quickly, and who carelessly left open the safety cage, possibly because it was defective, caused the death of my great-aunt Salina “Lina” Schoonmaker on June 7, 1909.

  5. Matthew Hall says:

    Thanks for this entry – my favorite (still standing) building in the city! What a beauty. Enjoyed the secrets!

  6. Suzanne Herman says:

    Number one is incorrect. Daniel Burnham was the architect for this building: http://www.archdaily.com/109134/ad-classics-flatiron-building-daniel-burnham/

    • michelle young says:

      The paragraph I wrote states that Burnham was the architect. It’s named after Fuller, who developed steel construction. In actuality, designer Frederick P. Dinkelberg was more involved in the building.

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