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Image via Flickr by William Murphy

As August drags us along a slow, but inevitable close to the summer, many of us find our minds drifting off to a faraway place free from the responsibilities of home and the workplace: Europe. We crave the architecture, the atmosphere, and the relaxed pace of life that Europe provides. While all of this exists a lengthy flight away, lucky for us New Yorkers, there is one piece of Europe that we can find within our very own city: the food.

Unlike any other city in the world, New York offers a diverse and authentic array of foods from varying cultures across the globe. So, if you’re craving the taste of Europe that so many of us are at this time of the year, here are 10 authentic European restaurants in New York  City that will give you the perfect fix:

10. English: Tea & Sympathy

 Image via Facebook: Tea & Sympathy

Tucked away in a cozy corner of the West Village lies a small restaurant decorated with mismatched teapots and newspaper excerpts from England: Tea & Sympathy, which offers a full English breakfast with endless tea and scones so delicious that even a New Yorker will have trouble finding fault with it.

The restaurant also offers lunch and dinner, including traditional British dishes like Shepard’s pie and a variety of finger sandwiches. This quaint, eloquent eatery provides a full British experience right in the center of New York City.

Address: 108 Greenwich Ave, New York, NY 10011

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2 Responses
  1. anne mcadoo Reply

    As regards the restaurant I Sodi, mentioned as having authentic Tuscan cuisine, the two pasta dishes mentioned are completely and totally from Rome and the region where Rome lies, Lazio. Spaghetti cacio e pepe is an ancient recipe of sheep herders and its origin is totally clear in that it uses Pecorino Romano. Penne alla vodka is a more recent recipe, circa 1980’s in Rome, but some people attribute its origins to a restaurant in Bologna.

  2. Gernot Trolf Reply

    When the writer of this article doesn’t that AQUAVIT is not a Nordic wine but a schnapps or hard liquor and then calls a WIENER SCHNITZEL German food one is not to sure about the other restaurants and specialties.
    The writer needs to know what he is writing about but apparently is not knowledgeable enough to do so.

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