5. The Shore Theatre

View of the auditorium from the balcony. Image and writing by Matt Lambros: After the Final Curtain

The Shore Theatre opened as the Loew’s Coney Island Theatre on June 17, 1925. The 2,387 seat theater was built by the Chanin Construction Company, which was also known for the construction of the now demolished Roxy Theatre in Manhattan. Before opening, the theater was leased to the Loew’s theater chain. The Shore was designed in a Renaissance revival style by the Reilly & Hall architecture firm, who were proteges of famed theater architect Thomas W. Lamb.

Loew’s ended its lease in 1964, when it was taken over by the Brandt Company. The theater was then renamed Brandt’s Shore Theatre. A year later the Brandt Co. switched the theater to a live performance venue. They attempted to appeal to Brooklyn’s large Jewish population by presenting stage shows such as “Bagels & Yox.” When that failed to catch on they switched to burlesque shows before resuming showing motion pictures.

By the early 1970’s, the Shore had turned to exploitation and eventually adult films. The theater closed permanently in March of 1973. The seats on the main level were removed and the floor was leveled to convert the space into a bingo hall. The Shore Theatre facade was declared a historical landmark by the Landmarks Preservation Commission on December 14, 2010. The inside of the theater is not landmarked, and could be demolished. In early 2016, developer Pye Properties purchased the site for $20 million with the ultimate goal of bringing back live entertainment and returning the venue back to its glory days.