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Xavier Delory-Villa Savoye-Graffiti-Pilgrimage of Modernity-Poissy-France

The iconic Villa Savoye in Poissy, a surburb of Paris, is an epitome of architect Le Corbusier’s design theories, including the Five Points of Architecture. It’s a requisite pilgrimage for architecture students and enthusiasts, where visitors can see where many Modernist architectural maxims of today were realized, from the piloti that raised the building, to ribbon windows, open plan interiors, and roof terraces.

Belgian artist Xavier Delory has embarked on a “Pilgrimage of Modernity,” a quirky tribute of the monuments of the modern movement, he writes. To that end, via Photoshop he’s plastered the walls of the Villa Savoye with graffiti.

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The Woolworth Building is one of New York City’s most famous off-limits landmarks. Though its Byzantine, cathedral-like interior of glass tesserae and marble is landmarked, security concerns after 9/11 rendered it closed to only those that worked in the skyscraper, once the tallest in the world.

We’ve worked with Woolworth Tours, a company founded by Helen Post Curry, the great-grand daughter of the building’s architect, Cass Gilbert to curate tours of the building lobby and basement level specifically tailored for our discerning readership here at Untapped Cities. Our next tour, on October 9th, will be led by Lisa Renz. a preservationist and historian working directly with the archives of the Woolworth Building through the New York Historical Society.

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It’s not surprising that many photographs submitted by our readers feature New York City’s skyscrapers, the icons of the city’s skyline.

Hashtag #UntappedCities on Instagram and Twitter if you would like to have one of your photos entered in the running for our weekly “Best Of”column. Also, you can keep an eye on what contributors and readers are checking out by browsing the live feed.

MetLife and Chrysler Building by Sid aka 212sid

UntappedCities-InstagramRoundup-SkyscrapersOfNYC-212sid

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The Interborough Rapid Transit of New York City opened its first subway line in 1904. 468 stations and 24 subway lines make up the tapestry of what we now know as the New York City Subway. Here is a list of those stations that stand out as unique in both their history and appearance. The original 28 subway stations had beautiful fare control houses designed by George Heins and Christopher LaFarge, some can still be seen at Atlantic Avenue, Bowling Green, 72nd Street and other spots. But as the subway expanded, subway station style evolved to adapt to Manhattan’s geography and evolving architectural and design styles. 

1. 190th Street at Overlook Terrace

190th Street - Overlook  Terrace- Untapped CitiesImage via Flickr by jag 9889

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King's Cross Project-Development-London-Filling Stastion-Museum of Architecture-Viewing Station-KERB-030The Filling Station at King’s Cross

There’s a lot happening at King’s Cross in London and the many cities redeveloping along canals and waterfronts should take notice. Between the King’s Cross/St. Pancras stations and the hip neighborhood of Islington, an industrial reclamation is taking place, giving London a whole new zip code, 2000 new homes, 50 new buildings and 3.4 million square feet of workspace. Plus, Google’s new headquarters will be here. But what’s striking isn’t really the numbers, it’s how this redevelopment is happening and the fact that residents have already come en masse to hang out, even though the project is in the early stages.

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Surprised that’s paper? We were too when we checked out artist Christina Lihan’s free exhibit “Constructions” at the Citigroup Center at 53rd Street and Lexington Avenue in New York City. Lihan, of Lihan Studio, creates replicas of famous buildings, bridges, and cityscapes by hand-cutting paper. She doesn’t paint them, but uses the thickness of watercolor paper to make these 3-dimensional. Lihan patiently cuts, folds, and forms every detail of a building to create these scenes that put architecture in a new light.

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