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The Four Seasons Restaurant, in its iconic original incarnation at the Seagram Building closed on July 16th. Tomorrow at 10am, Wright’s auction of its mid-century interior decor and serving items will begin in the Pool Room of the restaurant. Fortunately, because the building is an interior and exterior landmark, the interior will remain in its fundamental form.

The interior of the restaurant was designed by Philip Johnson with tableware and cookware by Garth and Ada Louise Huxtable, special-ordered Knoll furniture, and custom designs by Johnson, Eero Saarinen, and Mies van der Rohe, who designed the Seagram Building.

Here are some highlights from the upcoming auction:

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The Pierre Hotel Rotunda RoomRecently restored Rotunda room at The Pierre Hotel

The newly renovated Rotunda Room in The Pierre Hotel, was unveiled on July 12th. This oval, central room within the 86 year-old hotel has been used for everything from wedding ceremonies, film shoots, to afternoon tea. But it wasn’t until 1967, when The Pierre became a co-op with 75 full-time residences and a hospitality company running the 189 guest rooms, that artist Edward Melcarth (1914-1973) was commissioned to paint the famous trompe l’oeil Rotunda Room murals. His Renaissance murals had a few surprising images standing alongside mythical figures, and included prominent people in New York society, who were not all pleased with their image being painted on the hotel walls.

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Untapped Cities and the NYCEDC will host a special tour of the normally off-limits Seaview Hospital on Staten Island on August 13th at 11 am, a landmarked property that that still functions as a city-run long term care facility, as part of our Behind the Scenes NYC Tour Series.

Sea View Hospital was once the pride of the city’s health care system, built at great cost to combat tuberculosis. In fact, it was the most expensive city-owned health care facility. On this walking tour led by Munro Johnson, Vice President of Development at NYCEDC, see how abandoned buildings and active ones sit side by side at this historic hospital. Climb to the top of the abandoned Children’s Hospital, frequently featured in television shows like Gotham and Boardwalk Empire, step inside the network of tunnels that connect the buildings at Sea View and inside some of the abandoned spaces within the buildings. Learn the development plans for this unique site, the preservation efforts that have already been undertaken and are underway, and how the site connects to the Staten Island Greenbelt.

Here are some additional images of what you will see on this tour:

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Tonight, July 21st, Ed Hamilton, author of Legends of the Chelsea Hotel will read from his new small press fiction book, The Chintz Age: Tales of Love and Loss for a New New York at 6:00 pm at the Jefferson Market Library in Greenwich Village. We have below an excerpt from the book about the famed Freedom Tunnel, the urban exploration hotspot underneath Riverside Park.

While The Chintz Age focuses on artists and their response to gentrification, it’s also a book about nostalgia for old New York, and the longing for a fabled past that is somehow better than the present. In seven stories and a novella, Hamilton takes on the clash of cultures between the old and the new, as his characters are forced to confront their own obsolescence in the face of a rapidly surging capitalist juggernaut. Ranging over the whole panorama of New York neighborhoods—from the East Village to Hell’s Kitchen, and from the Bowery to Washington Heights—Hamilton weaves a web of urban mythology.  Punks, hippies, beatniks, squatters, junkies, derelicts, and anarchists—the entire pantheon of urban demigods—gambol through a grungy subterranean Elysium of dive bars, cheap diners, flophouses, and shooting galleries, searching for meaning and a place to make their stand.

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Dry Dock 6-Brooklyn Navy Yard-NYC

Yesterday, we got a unique chance to see the dry docks at the Brooklyn Navy Yard from a unique angle: via the water. Most ferry boats and pleasure cruises rarely turn into the Navy Yard Basin (also known as Wallabout Bay), sticking to the most efficient path on the East River. But we were being taken to see the working waterfront in New York City aboard the historic Fireboat John J. Harvey, as part of the project to rehabilitate the S.S. Columbia, a passenger steamship from Detroit that will be making its way down the Hudson River to New York City next year.

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