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Subway-Tile-Collage-Untapped-Cities

As riders of the New York City City, we’re all familiar with the rats and supposed mole-people, the trash and mold, and have come to ignore–or accept–the many unpleasantries of the NYC subway. What we often forget is that the MTA had originally planned for a ride on the subway to be a luxurious experience, as evidenced by the glorious (and decommissioned) City Hall subway station. By combining art and technology, New Yorkers back in 1904 had high hopes for their new underground.

The original Interborough Rapid Transit Company pulled in artists to create civic works specifically to enhance the subway experience. At the time of the international Arts and Crafts Movement, architects and artists designed ceramic ornament for subway signage. The signs not only announced the name of the stop, but planners also hoped that color, design elements, and eventually illustrations would be recognizable by non-English speakers so that they could orient themselves. Most of the tile designs were done by Heins & LaFarge (1901–1907) and Squire Vickers (1906–1942).

There are constantly additions being made by artists, local schools, and others, but we’re sharing with you some of our favorite original Arts and Crafts/Beaux Arts-style ceramics from around when the subway first opened in 1904:

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New York New Jersey Rail car-float operation-Hudson River-NYC-01Image via Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance 

Freight barges aren’t something we think about all the time but did you know there’s a floating train barge that crosses the Hudson River twice a day? It’s known as the New York New Jersey Rail car-float operation and just last week, the Port Authority approved a $356 million contract that will upgrade the system. The current floats transport 14 train cars at once, an equivalent of 56 semi-trucks, but the new cars will be able to accommodate 18 train cars. By crossing the Hudson, the floats take trucks off the highways and give freight a more direct route between New York and New Jersey. (more…)

The Interborough Rapid Transit of New York City opened its first subway line in 1904. 468 stations and 24 subway lines make up the tapestry of what we now know as the New York City Subway. Here is a list of those stations that stand out as unique in both their history and appearance. The original 28 subway stations had beautiful fare control houses designed by George Heins and Christopher LaFarge, some can still be seen at Atlantic Avenue, Bowling Green, 72nd Street and other spots. But as the subway expanded, subway station style evolved to adapt to Manhattan’s geography and evolving architectural and design styles. 

1. 190th Street at Overlook Terrace

190th Street - Overlook  Terrace- Untapped CitiesImage via Flickr by jag 9889

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Bushwick Aberdeen Subway Station - Anna Brown - Untapped Cities

New York City boasts 468 subway stations, and many more entrances. In the past, we have covered how businesses have creatively occupied stations to provide unexpected services like hair cuts, or having your keys made.

This week, we’re calling out the Bushwick Ave-Aberdeen Street stop off the L train. Usually, small businesses house their services within a station, but at this stop, the subway entrance itself is housed between two used car dealerships. The station was built in 1928, but the two plots around it were approved for automotive sales and services in 1946.

So why haven’t these car dealerships been cleared for trendy apartments and lofts like the rest of Bushwick? Perhaps because the Bushwick-Aberdeen train station is located in a region zoned as a C8-1 Commercial District. According to the Department of City Planning, these regions are designated for “commercial and manufacturing uses that often require large amounts of land.” Uses can include “automobile showrooms and repair shops, warehouses, gas stations and car washes.”

Bushwick Aberdeen Subway Station - Anna Brown - Untapped Cities 2

Right east of this zone lies a M1 Manufacturing District Zone, where the borders of Bushwick, East New York, and Bed Stuy meet at Broadway-Junction, a major subway hub that connects the A, J, C, and L trains. The M1 zone is designated for “light industrial uses, such as woodworking shops, repair shops, and wholesale service and storage facilities.” From the L train platform, you can view an example of this in the massive East New York Yard where the J, M, Z and L trains are stored and repaired.

East New York Yard - Flickr - Untapped CitiesEast New York Subway Yard, image via Flickr by OBI*ONES*KENOBI

Perhaps the surrounding area’s lack of residential opportunities explains why subway ridership at the Bushwick-Aberdeen Station ranked 403 out of 421 in 2013. Still, it can’t hurt to have a business near a train station that potential customers pass by every day. Perhaps these businesses have hopes that commuters can be lured into purchasing that 2007 Toyota Camry to forgo a crowded train ride to work. We’re not sure if even a car could compete with those high-speed aerial gondolas, though.

Check out our extensive coverage of the New York City subways, including the Top 12 Secrets of the NYC Subway and the 14 Beautiful Vintage Subway Entrances. h/t to Time Out NY for this find.

If you have any New York City subway finds, share them with Anna Brown via her Twitter handle @brooklynbonanza.

Standards-manual-nyc-MTA-untappedImage via Pentagram

Ever wonder about the NYC’s subway signage? Most New Yorkers who use the subway daily have probably never heard of the design firm Unimark. In 1970, designers Massimo Vignelli and Bob Noorda of Unimark created a language not only for how people would read subway signs, but also the way people would use the NYC subway for the next 44 years. The published document was a 13″ x 13″ Standards Manual held together in a 3-ring binder. And now, Pentagram is hoping to bring it back via a Kickstarter campaign that goes until October 8th. It’s been so popular that they have raised more than 5x the $108,000 goal so far.

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From your user submitted images, we can tell you love the subway just as much as we do! Here are this week’s picks for the best of the subway pics in our #UntappedCities photo pool. Hashtag #UntappedCities on Instagram and Twitter if you would like to have one of your photos entered in the running for our weekly“Best Of” column. Also, you can keep an eye on what contributors and readers are checking out by browsing the live feed.

Entrance to the Subway by mrsteveh

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