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Photo via Flickr Commons/Jay Reed.

The Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge, which connects Queens to Manhattan, rarely gets the attention that it merits. Many New Yorkers drive or bike across the bridge on a daily basis and it is also a popular running spot because it provides magnificent views of the East RiverRoosevelt Island and Manhattan from high above.

Designed by engineer Gustav Lindenthal and architect Henry Hornbostel, it is the “longest of the East River Bridges, with an overall length of 7,449 feet,” according to the New York City Department of Transportation. The construction of the Queensboro Bridge began in 1901, and the bridge officially opened on June 18, 1909. To better appreciate its history and significance, here are our top ten secrets of New York City’s Queensboro Bridge.

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1-Mika Tajima Meridian Gold Untapped Cities copyA new art installation in Long Island City. Image via SculptureCenter

July is arriving with a splash, literally, in the form of an 8,000-square-foot mural on a pool and mists of water vapor giving off golden fluctuations every two seconds. When visiting New York City’s best art installations this July, viewers may also go bird-watching at the Winter Garden and enjoy colorful new Essex Street Market murals. Our parks unfold a whole host of installations this month, including a two-headed goddess enlightening us with The Language of Things at City Hall Park and showing us how Art in Public Spaces should enhance our lives.

We will go back in time to view the early works of a famous New York City street photographer and honor what was once the Greenwich Village studio of an iconic artist. Finally, we will have a new and engaging Midnight Moment through the end of the month. Here are 11 installations and exhibits you might enjoy during the month of July.

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On an Open House New York boat tour, Stuart Miller and Sharon Seitz, authors of the book The Other Islands of New York talked guests through the history of New York City’s other islands, of which there are many.

Miller describes on the tour how the islands reflect the story of the city as its priorities have shifted over time. Some were originally purposed as military protection from the British during the War of 1812, named later for the families that owned them, and transformed over time into places of leisure, of isolation, of residence, and often of heterotopia. We’ve compiled here other islands of New York City. (more…)

Barretto Point Park-Hunts Point-The Bronx-Floating Pool-NYC-3Photo by Malcolm Pinckney via NYC Parks

Among New York City’s 520 miles of coastline and far from the hordes of people that crowd New York’s more popular beaches are a host of lesser known parks offering waterfront access, panoramic views, and even natural wildlife discovery. The city published a map of all of New York’s public waterfront space, but we’ve picked out some of the most interesting from each of the five boroughs. Check them out!

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In an age when academics and scientists love to talk about breaking down departmental silos, blurring the barrier between town and gown, and cross-disciplinary synergy, an island might seem an odd place to site an applied sciences campus. But it is on Roosevelt Island‘s meager 150 acres that Cornell University is doing just that. In partnership with Israel’s Technion Institute, Cornell won a city-led competition to develop a science- and technology-focused university campus within the five boroughs.

Since breaking ground in January 2015, construction on the first phase of the campus has sped along at a surprising clip, and it is set to open to students in the fall of 2017. Last week, Open House New York invited two of the architects behind the campus’s SOM-designed master plan to lay out what’s happened thus far and what we can expect in the coming years.

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DSC08592Image via Flickr by Lucas

Who doesn’t love a fairy tale? Even pragmatic New Yorkers could not resist referencing the architecture of European nobility in the earlier days of the city. While many country mansions and manor homes outside of the city have a more overt reference to castle architecture, here in New York City there’s quite enough fairy dust to keep us curiously looking for more castles in our daily commute.

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