Posts by turnstiletours:

Brooklyn Army Terminal-Exterior-NYC

This is the final installment of our 3-part series on the Brooklyn Army Terminal. We’ve looked into where Elvis would have walked when he embarked, whether the place is abandoned, and what the deal is with the balconies in the main atrium. We hope you’ll join us for our upcoming Brooklyn Army Terminal tour on Sunday, October 26th, tickets below.

Brooklyn Army Terminal – that’s part of Industry City, right?


Brooklyn Army Terminal-Myths-Balconies-Atrium-NYCImage by Andrew Gustafson

Last week, we began our series on the myths of the Brooklyn Army Terminal, letting you know where Elvis set foot on the premises (not where you think!) and clarifying the “abandoned” status of the building. Today, we’re continuing with another myth. Join us for our next tour of the magnificent building on Sunday, October 26th with Turnstile Tours. Tickets here.

1. What is up with those crazy balconies?


The Brooklyn Army Terminal is one of the most imposing–and least understood–buildings on the South Brooklyn waterfront. Built in 1918-1919 to serve as the main supply depot for American forces fighting in Europe during World War I, the Terminal (or BAT as it’s known today) saw nearly five decades of service to the US military, and today it continues to serve as a hub for industrial development and job creation in New York City.

Turnstile Tours has been researching and offering public tours of BAT for just a little more than a year (join the Untapped Cities tour Sunday, Oct. 26!), and we thought we would share some of our knowledge about the site and dispel some of the myths and rumors that have swirled around it.