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If you’re curious what the New York City subway system looked like the 1980s, check out this video of Times Square-42nd Street in 1986. The rail and photography enthusiast runs a German website called Pacific Railroad and shot this footage during a trip through the United States and Canada. While living in Canada, he was inspired by the North American railways, he writes on the website.

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In this above video, meet Charlie Pellett, a news anchor and reporter for Bloomberg Radio for over 20 years. He’s also the voice of the New York City subway system, most famous for “Stand clear of the closing doors please.” Pellett’s voice was used as a recording on the newest line of subway cars, the R142A series which came into service in 1999.

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We last caught up with puppet Johnny T and his hilarious video about New York City subway etiquette. Now, The New York Times interviews him about the latest MTA campaign against “manspreading.” Seeing the word “manspreading” on the homepage of the Times is awesome enough, but then with Johnny T? We had to share.

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Danny Lyon-MTA Subway Photograph-1966-NYC-6
Magnum photographer Danny Lyon captured commuters on the New York City subway back in 1966. Today, and for the next year, they are on display at the Atlantic Avenue Barclays Center stop in Brooklyn. These amazing color photographs don’t look their age; there’s a certain quality to Lyon’s work that makes these 48-year-old photographs feel contemporary, except for the obvious changes to the decor of the subway.

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NYC Subway Token

The last time anyone in NYC actually used a token was 11 years ago. For 50 years New Yorkers used these little round coins (that we would mistake for quarters constantly) to ride the subway until the Metrocard debuted and made them obsolete (as well as the token booths, which are slowly being erased too). At the time of the forced token extinction, the MTA had 60 million tokens in circulation. Tons of coins with no pocket or subway to call home. So where did they all go? Were they dumped in the middle of the sea like old train cars? Are they all in some sort of stock room, only sprung out when someone wants a souvenir? Well an article on Gizmodo today revealed what happened to the beloved subway token .  (more…)

Ridgewood Intermodal Terminal Dispatcher Booth-Queens-Bushwick-Myrtle Wyckoff-NYC-2

In 2010, the Ridgewood Intermodal Terminal opened at Myrtle-Wyckoff station on the border of Brooklyn and Queens, line facilitating subway to bus transfers along the L and M lines. The project from the MTA was completed at a cost of $4.5 million, bringing together the numerous bus lines in the area into a small stretch on Palmetto Street, which is open to buses and deliveries only. Much like the newspaper stand that mimics the original Heins and LaFarge fare control station on 72nd Street, the dispatcher booth is a miniature house that is in the same aesthetic as the main house, just across the street.

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