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1-Looking Up 1-28-16 - Version 2Thomas Friedman’s ‘Looking Up’ on Park Avenue

In New York City, the month of February will usher in thoughtful exhibits and installations, both indoor and outdoor, highlighting the way we live and work. Technology and the digital arts have arrived with a full-force of exhibits, translating our inner hard-drives into colorful patterns of our everyday web-lives. They are joined by a view of the spaces we live and work in, from our urban boxes to our loft-like live/work spaces.

The Guggenheim Museum will walk hand-in-hand with Times Square Arts and The Public Art Fund to show us How To Work Better.  Life as seen through our artistic endeavors can shine a light on global issues that touch us all and it can present in images conditions in other parts of our world, both past and present. In the end, we are all Looking Up at the same sky, even if not from Park Avenue.

Without further ado, 18 exhibits to check out in February: (more…)

Palazzo Chuppi-Greenwich Village-Julian Schnabel-Pink Apartment Building-NYC

New York City’s architecture changes and evolves with design trends. Sometimes, buildings get full makeovers. Other times, they go through slow transitions, barely noticed. Here are 10 buildings and structures in New York City that have had deliberate color changes over the years:

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atlantic-yards-barclay-brooklyn-frank-gehry-nyc-untapped-cities.57 PMFrank Gehry’s Atlantic Yards

Architectural critic Paul Goldberger’s new biography about Frank Gehry, Building Art: The Life and Work of Frank Gehry, addresses the architect’s trials and triumphs in New York City. The city represented, Golberger writes, “the unattainable, the mountain that he would try repeatedly to climb, only to find himself sliding back down.” Gehry broke this spell finally with the IAC Building on Manhattan’s west side and the residential skyscraper, New York by Gehry. But prior to these, the city seemed to always evade him, apart from the cafeteria he designed in the Condé Nast headquarters in Times Square.

Here are five projects Gehry designed for the city that were never realized:

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guggenheim secrets .org 3 -NYC-Untapped CitiesImage via guggenheim.org

Few buildings in New York City strike a more iconic silhouette than the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in the Upper East Side of Manhattan. A concrete spiral and one of famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright‘s most notable creations, the museum sees just as many visitors seeking to appreciate its architecture as it does visitors coming for the art. Built in 1959, the story of its conception and construction married Wright’s avant-garde design instinct with Solomon R. Guggenheim’s taste for art that pushed boundaries. The building, which was renovated in full in 2005, is one of the most popular destinations in the city’s art scene even eighty years after its opening day. Here are the top 10 secrets we found about the place.

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frank-lloyd-wright-guggenheim-museum-nyc-original-001The Guggenheim’s original four story tower built by Frank Llloyd Wright’s son-in-law, William Wesley Peters. Image via Guggenheim

In a city where nothing is sacred and almost every architectural landmark is liable for an overhaul (take 5 Pointz for instance), it may come as no surprise that many of NYC’s most famous museums had also undergone many drastic changes over the years.  Just how drastic some of those changes were may shock you though. We’ve mentioned in the past how you used to be able to drive up to front of the Metropolitan Museum of Art (in an era when most people didn’t have cars yet no less), but now we’re going to provide you with this list of photos portraying the original incarnations of NYC’s most famous museums.

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The Illuminator calls the Guggenheim Museum a “1% Museum.” Another projected messages: “Art is not a Luxury.” 

The spirit of Occupy Wall Street lives on as The Illuminator political art project roams New York City projecting guerrilla protest messages onto buildings. Using a plain white van equipped with audio and visual projection, as well as an info-shop and mini library, the group of eight artists display a Bat-signal spotlight with a location-specific message. In March, the above message was among those displayed on the 88th Street Guggenheim Museum as a protest to the Guggenheim Foundation’s treatment of migrant workers in Abu Dhabi, where their newest museum is currently being built. (more…)