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Jean-Pierre Laffont-Photojournalism-Photograpy-1970s-Bronx-Plymouth Savoy-Vintage Car-NYC

Legendary photojournalist Jean-Pierre Laffont captured the changing times of New York City, covering everything from free love to the grim and gritty ’70s. His photographs always seem to tell more than one story. In one, the Twin Towers soar optimistically over two homeless men sitting next to a freeway pocked-marked with trash. But it was shot in the 70s, when The World Trade Center lay virtually empty, as the city was nearly bankrupt. Another shows a prostitute–her breasts exposed–posing flirtatiously with a police car, at a time when the cops barely had a grip on the huge surge in crime around Times Square.

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Liao-flatiron-nyc-untappedImage via Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao

How to capture the dynamic energy of New York City in a single photograph? “Assembled Realities,” an upcoming exhibit of photographs by Taiwanese photographer Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao at the Museum of the City of New York does just that. Using different techniques and large format photography, Liao pushes the boundaries of the traditional artistic format to capture the city as it is actually viewed–by countless people, from all different perspectives. Telling The New York Times“It’s not real, but your brain says it’s real. I am documenting a concept. It looks documentary. I love to see how an image can be seen on so many different levels by a viewer.”

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powerful-18 Image via US Department of Labor

In honor of 9/11, we’ve pulled together some of the most iconic and powerful images from the tragic event thirteen years ago that are available at Getty Images and the Library of Congress. If you’re in New York City today, there are many places where you can pay your respects, including these ten locations that won’t have you on lines at the World Trade Center site. (more…)

Basketball players in front of Daniel Hauben's "Under the El," installed by the MTA on Freeman Street in 2005

Basketball players in front of Daniel Hauben’s “Under the El,” installed by the MTA on Freeman Street in 2005

When we headed up to Freeman Street in the Bronx to see the new Seis del Sur photo exhibit, Sin Límites, we were certainly surprised. This once discouraged-looking elevated stop is hopping with cultural draws. As you get off the train you’ll see elegant panels of colored faceted glass illustrating different subway scenes. Called “The El,” the six panels were created by artist Daniel Hauben, once dubbed the “Bruegel of the Bronx” by the New York Times, who was commissioned by the MTA’s Arts for Transit project in 2005.

Given that the original Seis del Sur exhibit, Dispatches from Home, documented some of the most dramatic and disturbing graffiti in the history of New York, visitors might be justifiably surprised to see the pristine condition of these public art works. Yet pristine they are—not a cracked piece of glass or ugly vandalism as far as the eye can see.

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Here are our picks for the best of the Untapped Cities Photo Pool: Vantage Point. We picked these photos because they are all taken from an unexpected perspective. Remember, to have one of your photos entered in the running for a “Best Of” nod, just use  #untappedcities on Instagram or Twitter. Keep an eye on what contributors and readers are checking out by browsing the live feed.

Chasing Light by Denn_ice aka Denn_ice

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Here are our picks for our Photo Pool. To have one of your photos entered in the running for a “Best Of” nod, just use #untappedcities on Twitter or Instagram. Keep an eye out for what contributors and readers are checking out by browsing the live feed.

An L.A. Escalator by Ridd aka @edd_brock

LA-California-Untapped Cities-Paige Kasick

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