07/25/14 12:00pm

other-bridges-of-nyc-round-up-5

We all love our iconic, innovative, and picturesque bridges (insert photos of the Brookly, Manhattan, and Queensboro Bridges here), but New York City is home to far more bridges, each with its own unique story to tell. Below, we round up some of the city’s “other” bridges, who have made the cut either for their obscurity, their interesting history, or their other distinguished features. (more…)

07/25/14 10:00am
"Audrey Hepburn" by Tristan Eaton, located at Caffe Roma on Mulberry and Broome St.

“Audrey Hepburn” by Tristan Eaton, located at Caffe Roma on Mulberry and Broome St.

For nearly 2 years,  the L.I.S.A. Project NYC has been bringing wonderful street art to Little Italy and the surrounding areas, to create downtown Manhattan’s first mural district.  A 401c non profit organization, The L.I.S.A. Project NYC works in collaboration with the Little Italy Merchants’ Association.  We recently had the pleasure of interviewing L.I.S.A. Project NYC founder and curator, Wayne Rada.

UC: How did the L.I.S.A. Project NYC get started?

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07/25/14 9:00am

japanese house prospect park south brooklyn new york city untapped cities museum of the city of new yorkA Postcard of the Japanese house ca. 1915. The house has since been re-painted red-orange with teal beams. Image via Museum of the City of New York, via Old Images of New York

Urban legend tells that this Japanese house was built special for the Japanese Ambassador, and it was shipped over piece by piece from Japan. Neither of those stories are true. What is true, however, is that somebody actually lives in this Japanese style house south of Prospect Park in Flatbush-Ditmas Park. It was built in 1903, and currently, the house has landmark status and it is valued at over $1 million. (more…)

07/24/14 4:00pm

Here’s what the Untapped staff is reading today!

07/24/14 2:00pm

Tickets for our upcoming Untapped Cities tours are going fast. Our Edgar Allan Poe Greenwich Village tour is already sold out, but there are two tickets left for the August Woolworth Building tour (and more dates in October, November and December), plus new tours added of a real Prohibition Speakeasy and an adventurous Vertical Tour of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine. Read more about these tours and get tickets below:

Tour of the Woolworth Building Lobby and Cocktail Event – August 23rd at 12pm

Untapped Cities will be offering readers the chance for intimate, hour-long tour of the normally off-limits Woolworth Building lobby led by Lisa Swyers, a preservationist working directly with the archives of the Woolworth Building. In addition to a guided visit through the spectacular lobby, we will also visit the basement level where the bank vault is located and where the former entrances to the subway are. Other locations, as seen on previous Untapped Cities tours, will be dependent on building access on the particular day. Untapped Cities works directly with the tour guides to provide additional access not necessarily available on regular tours of the building. Following the tour, we will lead guests to an optional cocktail hour at the historic Fraunces Tavern.

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07/24/14 12:00pm

Lincoln Center-1963-Demolition

Introducing our new series with 6sqft, a publication on architecture, real estate and neighborhoods in New York City. 

The glossy cultured patina of Lincoln Center reveals nearly nothing of what the neighborhood once was, and New Yorkers, accustomed to the on-going cycle of building and demolition, have likely forgotten (or never knew) about the lively San Juan Hill that was demolished to make way for the famous cultural center. Any such development dating from the 1960s wouldn’t be without the fingerprints of the now-vilified Robert Moses, who was more than willing to cut up neighborhoods both poor and wealthy in the eye of progress.

While the tough reputation of Hell’s Kitchen on the west side just south of Lincoln Center is well-documented in the history of the Irish diaspora, the history of San Juan Hill was mostly erased by a single sweep of urban planning, by nature of simply no longer existing. As New York City expanded and industrialized, immigrant communities moved northwards. African Americans were also part of this movement, even pre-Civil War, along with their neighbors the Irish, Italians and Germans.

Originally, all groups were mixing and getting in trouble down in Five Points. Harlem’s reputation as the center of African American culture wouldn’t exist without the gradual northward movement of their community through the 1800s. After Five Points, the population moved into Greenwich Village, then to the Tenderloin in the streets between the 20s and 30s, then to Hell’s Kitchen. The area that’s now Lincoln Center was the logical next step, originally settled by the Dutch as an enclave by the name of Blooming Dale with its leafy aristocratic country homes.

Read the rest on 6sqft.