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Inside Hunts Point Terminal Produce Market, image via CBS.

Opened in 1967, Hunts Point Terminal Produce Market is the largest produce market in the country. It occupies 105 acres, with four primary warehouse structures, two adjunct warehouses, and various administrative and maintenance structures.The market captures an estimated $2 to $2.3 billion in revenue per year, or 22% of regional wholesale produce sales, equivalent to approximately 60% of the produce sales within New York City.

The next event from the Behind the Scenes NYC Tour Series on June 24th will bring Untapped Cities/NYCEDC guests on a rare inside look at the market’s logistics and history from Myra Gordon, manager of the Hunts Point Terminal Produce Market, who will take the tour through the market’s repacking houses and produce displays while the market is in operation. There will also be an opportunity to chat with vendors at the market about their businesses, as well as a Q&A with Myra in the board room following the tour. 

Because the market is active only in the mornings and weekdays, the tour is scheduled for 9a, Wednesday on June 24th. Exact meeting location will be sent the week before the tour.

Tickets limited. Required attire: Comfortable shoes (no open toe shoes), appropriate tops, no shorts, short skirts.

In honor of Memorial Day, today we’re looking back at the history of the white marble Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument, located at 89th Street and Riverside Drive, a majestic memorial to those who fought in the Civil War. Unfortunately, few have had the chance to marvel at its serene mosaic interior. The monument has been open to the public sporadically throughout the years, most recently as part of Open House New York (though one year the key was unable to open the rusted lock and access was canceled).

The New York Times was recently given rare access to what lies hidden behind the monument’s locked door.
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untapped cities-photo pool-view from distance-halfpastm1 WTC by halfpastm

This week, the theme of the Untapped Cities Instagram roundup is New York City from a distance. Hashtag #UntappedCities on Instagram and Twitter if you would like to have one of your photos entered in the running for our weekly “Best Of”column. Also, you can keep an eye on what contributors and readers are checking out by browsing the live feed.

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Green Roof-Barclays Center-NYC

The 135,000 square foot green roof atop Brooklyn’s Barclays Center is taking shape (despite an extensive delay) and we recently got a nice note from our friends at Architects Newspaper that they got an exclusive look at the construction. In the video, Linda Chiarelli, Deputy Director of Construction for Forest City Ratner, explains that the roof trusses were not designed to hold the green roof so a “whole new roof structure was installed.”

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Rome was not built in a day, they say. And neither was New York City or its 24/7 subway system. All good things take time, and more so, when it cuts through some of the densest neighborhoods in America. On our fifth annual pilgrimage through the monumental construction site of the Second Avenue Subway, Dr. Michael Horodniceanu, president of the Capital Construction at MTA, led us through three new stations and 23 blocks of tunnels–from 63rd street to 86th street some 115 feet below Second Avenue.

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The sun is out, your shirtsleeves are cuffed, a spring’s in your step, and you’re ready for your… first day of kindergarten?

Groupings of primary colors are forever associated in my head with children’s toys, color-coding, and the simple, friendly atmosphere of school classrooms for young children. Bright, uncomplicated reds, yellows, and blues felt condescending to me as a kid, like the world of package design was telling me that I wasn’t smart enough for more nuanced tones yet.

I don’t think this gangly adult human walking in front of me in New York City was deliberately trying to look like a small child, but that backpack looks like a prop from Sesame Street, or like what a performer at a drag ball would wear to accomplish “schoolboy realness.”
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