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These days, timeless literature set in New York City makes people think of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, so we’re suggesting some other works with an NYC setting. We’ve picked our favorite classics, and thrown in some more recent or lesser-known fictional works that use the city as more than just a backdrop for a story– New York becomes an integral element of these writers’ works.

1. Let the Great World Spin Colum McCann (2009)

1-books-nyc-untappedImage via Tumblr: A Book Cover a Day

Let the Great World Spin offers a very real representation of a gritty New York in the ’70s, using the great tightrope walk by Phillipe Petit as a unifying event. Colum McCann weaves the stories of multiple protagonists into a web centrally focused on the city and the very real lives of the people in it.

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Last month, Brooklyn real estate broker Dan Levy proposed a system of gondola lifts to ferry people between Manhattan and quickly growing waterfront neighborhoods in Brooklyn and Queens. Dubbed the East River Skyway, the proposal is modeled as a sort of juiced up Roosevelt Island Tram. Levy envisions the system connecting South Street Seaport in lower Manhattan to Dumbo and the Navy Yard in Brooklyn, up to Williamsburg and across again to the Lower East Side, and a final stretch extending the Roosevelt Island tram over to Long Island City in Queens. He estimates the entire project could cost $225 million to $375 million, and could transport 5,000 commuters per hour per direction, with cars arriving every 30 to 40 seconds.

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This week, we are excited to explore the Met’s new plaza, a green design boat cruise, and sausage-making, while the weekend will be filled with cider appreciation, creative dog costumes, and an exclusive behind-the-scenes tour of the Brooklyn Army Terminal.

Monday, October 20th

At 12 p.m., guides from the architecture firm OLIN will be giving a tour of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s David Koch Plaza as part of Archtober, a month-long initiative of The American Institute of Architects New York Chapter and the Center for Architecture Foundation. The David Koch Plaza is finally open after a two year construction period, and according to the Museum’s website, boasts “completely new fountains, paving, and facade lighting, along with allées and bosques of trees leading to the Museum’s entrances from north and south, and seating areas for visitors.” Register on Archtober’s website, and read our other top picks of the festival’s events. (more…)

hart-island-abandoned-new-york-nyc-haunted-beds-spookyThe skeletal structures of the Hart Island Pavilion Building have gone untouched since 1976. Image via the Kingston Lounge.

Today’s most popular posts: The Hauntings of 14 West 10th Street, NYC’s “House of Death”10 NYC Event Picks for an Alternative, Off-the-Beaten Path Halloween 2014., 9 Restaurants in NYC To Get Unlimited Food and Drink Deals,

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Opening yesterday at 345 Broome Street, British street artist Nick Walker‘s first solo show in years All I Ever Wanted Was My Name On Fire is a showcase of new works by one of the originators of the British graffiti movement. Walker’s work has been seen around NYC for years; you may have noticed seeing a sinister looking man in a dark suit and bowler cap on the walls of Chinatown and the LES. Walker’s art constitutes a mixture of styles: stenciling, graffiti and dark humor, which has gained him a much deserved following around the world, especially in NYC.

His new works continue the style he has perfected since the early 90s. It also serves as a continuation of the Vandal (the dapper character of his artwork) storyline. The show is also promoting the newest book by the artist and his collaboration with London based tableware company Royal Dulton. The show is running for only one week so we suggest you find some time to catch one of the globe’s most popular street artists latest works and prints. (more…)

Ms Pac Man-New Yorck City-Untapped CitiesPhoto via Flickr Creative Commons by Jeremy Brooks

Ms. Pac-Man. The name brings back childhood memories for some, teenage nostalgia for others, or evokes images of a now bygone time. Ms. Pac-Man is the grand dame of the Golden Age of the arcade video game which spanned the late 1970s to 1980s. As one of the most popular video games of all time, Ms. Pac-Man (a sequel to the original Pac Man) features a female protagonist who is even considered a feminist icon by some. Ms. Pac-Man took arcading mainstream. In New York City there are places where one can still scurry from ghosts, devour pellets in order to weaken and eat said ghosts, and enjoy the love story of how Mr. and Ms. Pac-Man meet. This timeless arcade classic has managed to find a place in some of the most unique places New York City has to offer.

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