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Jonas-Salks-Childhood-Home-The Bronx-853 Elmsere Place-Historic Landmarks Medallion Jonas Salk lived with his family in an apartment complex located on 853 Elsmere Place in the borough of the Bronx

Last Thursday, the Historic Landmarks Preservation Center held a cultural medallion ceremony at the childhood home of world renowned scientist and humanitarian Jonas Salk, the man who developed the world’s first polio vaccine. Born on October 28, 1914, Jonas Salk lived with his parents and two younger siblings in an apartment complex located at 853 Elsmere Place in the Bronx.  Jonas Salk’s cultural medallion plaque states that, “In 1955, he developed the first polio vaccine with his research team at the University of Pittsburgh, at a time when polio crippled tens of thousands in the U.S. annually.”

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Last night, the latest Blueprint video from NYCmedia about the transformation of The High Line premiered. Before the full episode is available for streaming, here’s a reminder of where we’ve come since the High Line was constructed in 1934.

By 1934, the Manhattan’s West Side Elevated Line was constructed as part of a massive urban redevelopment project, spearheaded in part by Robert Moses. This was not the only elevated train line in Manhattan at the time. Its novelty, however, came by way of its path, bisecting city blocks, rather than running directly over traffic. Trains running on the High Line unloaded their cargo directly into buildings on Manhattan’s West Side, such as the warehouses for the National Biscuit Company (Nabisco), the present-day Chelsea Market. The original High Line tracks ran as far south as Spring Street, almost twice its current length. Though by 1961, most of this southern section had been demolished. 

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Smoking Ban-Mayor Michael Bloomberg-NYCImage via NPR

History remembers bold moves. Mayor Michael Bloomberg called his 2002 restaurant and bar smoking ban one of the most important things he had done in his life. It took effect 12 years ago, on March 30, 2003.

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Orange County Government Center-Goshen-Hurricane Irene-FEMA-Paul Rudolph-Brutalism-NY
This is the abandoned Orange County Government Center. Would you save it? It was built in 1970 and abandoned in 2011. It sits in the town of Goshen, New York, on the outermost fringes of the New York City Metropolitan area. It’s as far out as you can get while still being pulled ever so slightly towards midtown Manhattan, like a comet is pulled towards the sun.

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Will Ellis Dead Horse Bay-Brooklyn-NYC

Back by popular demand, join photographer/urban explorer Will Ellis, author of Abandoned NYC and Untapped Cities columnist, on a walk through the weird side of New York history at Brooklyn’s Dead Horse Bay on Saturday, May 2nd. Tales of buried pirate treasure, putrefied animal carcasses, and environmental devastation abound on this desolate shoreline, which once served as the final destination for the city’s carriage horses. Today this beach-comber’s paradise is covered with garbage dating back to a 1920s landfill deposit, offering a fascinating look at what New Yorkers were throwing away a century ago.  Bring a bag for take home a few of the incredible artifacts you’re sure to stumble upon—there’s plenty of trash to go around.

Join us on May 2nd as we escape again into New York’s past, revisiting history with Abandoned NYC’s Will Ellis. He’ll be giving a historical introduction to the site, weaving in tales from his experience photographing for his book Abandoned NYC, and showing the best places to look for artifacts.

The tour will meet at in front of the Target a block from the Flatbush Av- Brooklyn College subway stop at 12:45 pm to take the Q35 Bus together. See below for a video showing what you might see on our tour of Dead Horse Bay.

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Zez-City Kitty-Klops-ECB-Earthfolk-NYC-Street Art-Graffiti-Untapped Cities-001Zez One, City Kitty, ECB, Earthfolk & Klops

In our monthly showcase, Untapped Cities Street Art Columnist Christopher Inoa highlights the top five New York City graffiti and street art pieces found on the city’s walls, rooftops and tunnels. 

The cold of winter is finally behind us. Spring is returning to New York City and that means more art can be found on the streets. Goodbye big heavy coats and hello galleries and murals. Some of you may be rusty because you’ve been inside all winter, but the artists featured here kept working during the unpredictable weather this month. Here are five pieces of extraordinary art from some of NYC’s most popular graffiti and street artists, all waiting to be found and Instagrammed.  (more…)