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The Herald Center on 34th Sreet in Herald Square is getting an all new look. The blue, glass facade is being replaced in what seems like an attempt to make the often-overlooked Herald Square more glamorous like Times Square. As reported by Ephemeral New York, with the work underway, the original 1902 building has been revealed under the sheets of blue glass.

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There’s something about architects and businessmen wanting to live in the places they create. And we’re not talking about a live-work studio. We’ve been noticing a historical trend of apartments in grand civic spaces–from apartments atop the Eiffel Tower, Radio City, Bergdorf Goodman, the second Madison Square Garden–to more modern-day expressions of exclusivity–a cabin in a loft in Brooklyn, suburban houses plopped atop existing apartment buildings, an Fifth Avenue apartment full of secret riddles and compartments. Here’s a little about each of these idiosyncratic apartments.

1. Stanford White’s Seduction Lair at Madison Square Garden

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Coming in at number two on the Great Locations to Check Out During 2014 OHNY the Brooklyn Army Terminal (BAT), has been well covered historically on Untapped Cities, including a series on its myths. During a trip this prompted us to explore a little bit further. What we found while exploring the grounds was a rock solid ping-pong table at the north-west corner of Building B. This recent addition to the  to the property fits right in due to its cement construction and industrial metal net with a custom BAT cut-out. Just as the rest of the terminal is, this table is built to stand the test time.

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These days, timeless literature set in New York City makes people think of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, so we’re suggesting some other works with an NYC setting. We’ve picked our favorite classics, and thrown in some more recent or lesser-known fictional works that use the city as more than just a backdrop for a story– New York becomes an integral element of these writers’ works.

1. Let the Great World Spin Colum McCann (2009)

1-books-nyc-untappedImage via Tumblr: A Book Cover a Day

Let the Great World Spin offers a very real representation of a gritty New York in the ’70s, using the great tightrope walk by Phillipe Petit as a unifying event. Colum McCann weaves the stories of multiple protagonists into a web centrally focused on the city and the very real lives of the people in it.

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Last month, Brooklyn real estate broker Dan Levy proposed a system of gondola lifts to ferry people between Manhattan and quickly growing waterfront neighborhoods in Brooklyn and Queens. Dubbed the East River Skyway, the proposal is modeled as a sort of juiced up Roosevelt Island Tram. Levy envisions the system connecting South Street Seaport in lower Manhattan to Dumbo and the Navy Yard in Brooklyn, up to Williamsburg and across again to the Lower East Side, and a final stretch extending the Roosevelt Island tram over to Long Island City in Queens. He estimates the entire project could cost $225 million to $375 million, and could transport 5,000 commuters per hour per direction, with cars arriving every 30 to 40 seconds.

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This week, we are excited to explore the Met’s new plaza, a green design boat cruise, and sausage-making, while the weekend will be filled with cider appreciation, creative dog costumes, and an exclusive behind-the-scenes tour of the Brooklyn Army Terminal.

Monday, October 20th

At 12 p.m., guides from the architecture firm OLIN will be giving a tour of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s David Koch Plaza as part of Archtober, a month-long initiative of The American Institute of Architects New York Chapter and the Center for Architecture Foundation. The David Koch Plaza is finally open after a two year construction period, and according to the Museum’s website, boasts “completely new fountains, paving, and facade lighting, along with allées and bosques of trees leading to the Museum’s entrances from north and south, and seating areas for visitors.” Register on Archtober’s website, and read our other top picks of the festival’s events. (more…)