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meat-espositos-nyc-manhattan-butcher shops

Some things are better when they’re new but most things just have that irreplaceable charm when they’re old, like these classic New York City butcher shops. NYC was once filled with meat markets on almost every corner, however, today only a handful remain and we’re lucky that they do. With authentic butchery techniques that are more than half a century old, quality meats and shop locations around the boroughs, there is no doubt that New Yorkers are continuing to support family owned businesses.

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Patti Smith Robert Mapplethorpe-Untapped CitiesSource: Dangerous Minds.

A little over forty years ago, in a nightclub called Max’s Kansas City, Robert Mapplethorpe made his way through a crowd of artists, drag queens, and cocaine fiends, hoping to charm his way into Andy Warhol’s inner circle. His friend and ex-lover Patti Smith, then an unknown like him, watched his efforts warily. A few years later, Mapplethorpe would be shocking the art world with his provocative homoerotic photography and portraits of Warhol. Smith would be performing at Max’s. But before they achieved fame, they were vagrants moving through the world of artists, socialites, and provocateurs in downtown Manhattan. After Mapplethorpe lost his battle with AIDS in 1989, Patti Smith captured their experiences in her award-winning memoir Just Kids.

In this article, we’ll trace Patti Smith’s trail through New York City. Max’s, once a focal point of Warhol’s Factory, is gone now. There is a CVS at the address it once had north of Union Square. But other places are still here or remembered in film.

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+POOL-NYC-East-River-Filtering-Pool-Project

In honor of the warm weather (hopefully) dawning on the city soon, we thought we’d share a list of New York’s most notable swimming pools–from historically significant ones in ruins, a floating public pool in the works, to ones crowning five star hotels. What follows is a list of notable pools around the city.

1. Woolworth Building Pool

Woolworth Building-Pool-Pompeii-Wurts Brothers-Vintage Photo-NYCThe Woolworth Building‘s Pompeii inspired pool (photo via New-York Historical Society)

In the depths of the the Woolworth Building, one of New York’s most iconic landmarks, rests the remnants of a Pompeii-inspired pool. Covered extensively in our The New York City That Never Was column, the pool was designed by Woolworth Building architect Cass Gilbert and used until 1999 as part of the Jack Lalane health club. Today, it is undergoing renovation as part of the partial conversion of the Woolworth Building into luxury condominiums.

Check out our photos of the pool in its abandoned state, pre-renovation. Note our upcoming tour of the building, led by Cass Gilbert’s great granddaughter

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For more than a year, we’ve been bringing intrepid New Yorkers and visitors on a hunt of the architectural remnants of the original Pennsylvania Station still viewable inside and around the current station. There are few people that contest the tragedy of the demolition of Penn Station, which began on October 28, 1963, after the Pennsylvania Railroad found itself in serious financial trouble. The McKim, Mead and White masterpiece, only 53 years old, became a martyr for the landmarks preservation cause when the air rights to Penn Station were sold to accommodate Madison Square Garden, that perpetually moving entertainment venue.

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The vibrant foot traffic visible on St. Marks Place each night, with the street’s iconic St. Marks Hotel as the backdrop.

“A lot of groups complain about new groups coming in and replacing [the old] but if you’re not a Lenape, I don’t have sympathy for you,” joked author Ada Calhoun as she reflected on the early history of New York City’s St. Marks Place. Calhoun has just released her new book, St. Marks is Dead: The Many Lives of America’s Hippest Street and to celebrate, The Cooper Union held a ragin’ launch party in their Great Hall, conveniently located just a block south of St. Marks Place. (Photos by Mario Morgado, courtesy of The Cooper Union.)

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Crimson Beech Partial - Staten Island - Frank Lloyd Wright - Untapped Cities - NYC-001The Crimson Beech in Staten Island, one of the Marshal Erdman Prefab Houses. Image via Wikimedia Commons

Many know Frank Lloyd Wright as the legendary architect and mastermind behind several vast, important buildings (including the Guggenheim Museum) around the country. However, he also built houses for middle-class Americans in the mid 1900s. While we’re used to his grand creations, you can actually go to Staten Island to see one of these other constructions: The Crimson Beech.

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