zaha-hadid-grace-on-coronation-brisbane-australiaImage via Brisbane Development

The passing of Iraqi-British architect Dame Zaha Hadid yesterday at the age of 65 saddened much of the design world. Ms. Hadid was the first female architect to win the Pritzker prize, and was considered one of the most influential trendsetters in design. Known for her organic curves and fluid lines, Hadid not only influenced our built environment, but many aspects of life, such as shoes, accessories and utensils.

Of her completed projects, the Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati was her first United States project, the Vitra Fire Station in Germany her first realized work, and the Maxii Art Museum in Rome showcased what she would be capable of. The Guangzhou Opera House, London Aquatics Center for the 2012 Olympics, and the in-progress Al Wakri Stadium in Qatar thrust her onto the starchitects stage in recent years. The residential building at 520 W 28th Street along the High Line, opening later this year, will be her first New York City work.

But like many great architects throughout history, some of her projects were never realized. Here are 10 designs by Zaha Hadid that could have changed the way our world looks. (more…)

living-london-Sands-Studio-film production-studio

Just like New York City, London has myriads of untapped places and stories waiting to be discovered. Today, Living London, a website made up of “a collection of London places, photographs, stories, descriptions and poems,” has unearthed for us 10 of the quirkiest places in London. The project will soon expand its scope of work by leading walks and encouraging stewardship especially in disadvantaged communities.


grant's tomb-nyc-untapped citiesImage via Old-NYC

Big cities around the world boast impressive buildings and structures attracting many tourists eager to visit and experience the cities. Many like New York City also attracted (and continue to) immigrants who dreamed of opportunity. But there were others who would prey on the starry eyed and unsuspecting immigrants and tourists- con artists. Men like George Parker and Victor Lustig would become famous for “selling” famous city structures for upwards of $100,000. Here are some of those famous landmark scams spanning from New York, to Paris, and London(more…)

Andre Vicente Goncalves-Windows of the World-Photography-18Lisbon

Portuguese photographer André Vicente Gonçalves started his career in computer science, and it is perhaps this rational side that has led him to his most well-known work: Windows on the World, collages of windows from about twenty countries. While it’s popular to say that architecture has become too homogenized amidst globalization, a project like this reminds us of the power of vernacular architecture.


Spiral, Pen on paper, 27×35. Image from artist.

Across the Atlantic in London, artist Alex Evans made his name on Vine with his intricately drawn pen and ink illustrations composed of “geometric shapes and complex patterns which manipulate established traditions of mathematical space.” His work depicts hybrid architectural systems and topologies of the imagined city, often evoking images of metropolis such as New YorkHe has been nominated as a contender for this year’s Shorty’s Award – an annual awards event recognizing those producing real-time short form content across different social media platforms.


London Underground-London Pass-Infographic Fun Facts-Tube

What we love about old cities like London are the many fascinating discoveries that are literally beneath the surface of the streets. The London Underground subway system or the Tube, as its popularly called, is no exception. The team from London Pass has put together this great infographic with fun facts and history. Here are some highlights: