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Jefferson Market Library Interior-Greenwich Village-19

The landmarked Jefferson Market Library that sits between Sixth Avenue, Greenwich Avenue and Tenth Street had a fascinating prior life. The building was formerly a courthouse, with a prison next door where the garden is today, itself replacing a dingy police court over a saloon and a wooden fire tower. In 1967, just under a decade after being saved from demolition through community efforts and years of renovation, the building was reopened as a New York Public Library branch.

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EdgarAllanPoe_PoeTour_UntappedCities_GreenwichVillage_NewYork
Image via Wikimedia

Marry in May, rue the day? When Edgar Allan Poe wed his thirteen-year-old cousin Virginia Clemm on May 16th, 1836, he had little way of knowing what fodder he’d given the future gossip mongers of his day–and ours! From remarks about her tender age, their family ties, their lack of children, and his supposed affairs, the rumor mill would be busy turning for hundreds of years to come. But what about the real story?

Join Untapped Cities and Boroughs of the Dead on Saturday, May 16th, 2015 for “The Poe’s Greenwich Village,” a special edition of our historical walking tour from last year that steps into the Greenwich Village of the 1840s, where Edgar and Virginia Poe lived and worked. This tour will interweave some of Poe’s most famous tales with Greenwich Village’s macabre secret histories, all the while constantly striving to answer the question of what life was like for the Poes in mid-19th century New York, and sorting out the myths from the facts regarding their relationship and married life.

You will visit the site of three of their former homes, discover the places that inspired Poe, find out where he read “The Raven” for the first time in public, and learn of the scandals and triumphs he experienced while living in the Village — particularly the unfounded gossip of Edgar’s unprovable “love affairs” — all the while celebrating “a love that was more than love” on this fascinating, informative, and downright romantic walking tour.

tablefortwo_untappedcities_annabrownImage via Shani Ha

New Yorkers passing the corner of 7th Avenue and Carmine Street may notice something a little strange outside Cafe Español. Parisian artist Shani Ha has installed a bistro table split between inside and outside of the café, an installation she calls “Table for Two,” a piece inspired by Edward Hopper’s painting Nighthawks.

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On Friday, The New York Times published an article on New York City’s one-block streets–contending that they carry something antithetical to the city in some ways, proclaiming that bigger is not always better. But smaller can mean more expensive. While the article focuses much on the real estate nature of these wonderful enclaves, we’d thought we’d provide some historical tidbits and some of our own adds to the list.

1. Gay Street, Greenwich Village

Gay Street-Greenwich Village-NYC-One Block StreetImage via Wikimedia by Jean-Christophe BENOIST

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Bitcoin ATM-The Yard-Williamsburg-NYCBitcoin ATM at The Yard in Williamsburg. Image by Alban Denoyel of Sketchfab

We have a history of reporting on fun ATMs, from the Gold ATM on 57th Street, the Cupcake ATM from Sprinkles, and even some for bike parts. Yesterday, the CEO of Sketchfab, a platform for 3D models based in New York City, showed us the latest Bitcoin ATM he came across at The Yard in Williamsburg, a co-working space. There are now at least three Bitcoin ATMs in New York City, with the first at Flat 128 in Greenwich Village and at Bitcoin retailer, Coin Cafe on Nassau Avenue in Greenpoint which has it in an old-fashioned phone booth.

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McCarthy-Birdhouses-white-nyc-untapped

You can find McCarthy Square, a small but wonderfully maintained traffic triangle, where 7th Avenue, Charles Street, and Waverly Place intersect in the West Village. Beside a dedication to Joseph McCarthy, killed in World War II and a flagpole from the 1939 World’s Fair in Queens are a series of hand-crafted birdhouses.

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