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Public Theater-Lafayette Street-Astor Place-New York Symphony-Film Locations-Mozart in the Jungle-Amazon

The show Mozart in the Jungle, a commissioned series by Amazon for Prime Instant Video will return for a second season this fall starring Gael Garcia Bernal, Lola Kirke and Jason Schwarzman. Based in New York City and inspired by the book Mozart in the Jungle: Sex, Drugs, and Classical Music, a memoir by oboe player Blair Tindall, the show is set in New York City and follows the trials and tribulations of Hailey, an oboe player and her encounters with Rodrigo, the international superstar who is the new music director and conductor of the troubled (and fictional) New York Symphony.

Beyond an entertaining, binge-worthy first season, Mozart in the Jungle features some wonderful film locations, which urban explorers will recognize. It’s clear the film scouts on this show knows their stuff about New York City and its alternative side. Here are some highlights of New York City film locations from the first season:

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Hunts Point South-Waterfront-Wild-Abandoned-Park-Long Island City-Queens-NYC-021

This past weekend, on a predominantly unguided but fully sensory tour, 20 intrepid explorers headed out with Daniel Campo, author of The Accidental Playground  and artists Ellis Irons and Chris Kennedy, to take in Hunters Point South, one of the the city’s last accidental waterfront wild spaces. This post-industrial edge condition is a last holdout before encroaching development overtakes the Queens border with the East River. For many, even those that may live in Long Island City, this little patch of wilderness, with its stunning views of the Manhattan skyline, may come as a surprise. And as the leaders of this expedition showed, its presence is an important reminder of our relationship with the city’s natural environment as well as its long, complex history of development. 

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MoMA PS1- Samara Golden-The Flat Side of the Knife-Warm Up-Queens-Long Island City-Queens-NYC

One of the benefits of attending one of the Warm Up events at MoMA PS1, in addition to the live DJs, food from M. Wells and the booze, is that you can explore the exhibits inside while the party is taking place in the courtyard. It’s hard to believe Warm Up has been going on for 18 years now, but that’s a testament to its mission to provide experimental music and art across a range of genres. The building used to be the P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center and as its name suggests, it was originally the first public school in Long Island City.

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Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn 

New York City is abuzz with the latest news that nearly 100 proposed landmarks are to be “decalendered” by the NYC Landmarks Commission. Calendaring is considered the first step towards in landmarking process, something the The New York Times describes as an acknowledgment that a property is worthy of consideration for protection, at which point hearings and votes follow.” The properties selected for decalendaring have been on the list more than 5 years without a vote, and 80 have sat for more than 20 years. The properties, which include two proposed historic districts, fall in all five boroughs. In this article, we will highlight some of the most unique in each borough that will likely fall under this de-calendering.

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5 Pointz Demolition-Completed-Untapped Cities-Bhushan Mondkar-NYC

Untapped Cities writer Bhushan Mondkar snapped this photograph of the nearly complete demolition at 5Pointz over Thanksgiving weekend. We’ve been following the slow evisceration of the beloved street art hotspot over the past few months–heading into the building in mid-October and watching the sign come down at the end of October. Just before Thanksgiving, a memorial was held on the anniversary of the whitewashing. But this photograph heralds the end.

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Long Island City Clocktower-Bank of Manhattan-Queens-NYC-2

The Long Island City Clocktower building, also known as the Bank of Manhattan building, is under threat of demolition following a recent sale. In spite of its recognizable stature in Long Island City, the building is not landmarked, despite its historical significance. The Bank of Manhattan building was built in 1924, the first skyscraper in Long Island City and the tallest building in the borough. The Long Island Star Journal proclaimed that it would make Bridge Plaza, then a gardened promenade in the City Beautiful style, “the new Times Square of Queens.” The Bank of Manhattan itself was founded by Aaron Burr originally as the city’s first water delivery service. Those operations were old to the city in the 1808 as the banking side of the company became more profitable.

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