Man in the High Castle-Amazon-Film Locations-Nazi Times Square-NYC-001

The new Amazon show, Man in the High Castle is (loosely) based on the 1962 book by Philip P. Dick that reimagines the United States if the Allied forces had lost World War II. The East Coast to the Rocky Mountains, known as the “Greater Nazi Reich,” is ruled by the Nazi regime. The Japanese Pacific States in the west is ruled by the Japanese, with a thin Neutral Zone in the center of the country serving as a buffer between the two. The show takes place across the country, with two home bases – New York City and San Francisco, and traces the lives of two main characters – Juliana Crain and Joe Blake, two characters from opposite sides of the country who meet in Canon City in the neural zone.

A lot of the show’s establishing shots are edited with CGI, put on top of familiar places, the city of Seattle serves as some stand-ins for both New York City and San Francisco, while the interiors are clearly filmed on sets. We’ll focus first on locations set in and near New York City, then move to San Francisco and other locations.


1-Linda Cunningham No Longer Empty Untapped Cities AFineLyne“Surviving Then and Now” South Bronx Sagas” by artist Linda Cunningham

The No Longer Empty Curatorial Lab (NLE Lab) is addressing one of New York’s hot topics – community change – with its current exhibit NLE Lab: Intersecting Imaginaries. The subject matter, shown in visual form, explores the culture and current environment of the South Bronx, and at the same time, draws parallels with current changes going on throughout New York City. The exhibit addresses what happens when community connections are broken, and the many issues that affect the people who live there via site-specific works by a collection of artists.


Monopoly Sidney Mobell Untapped Cities AFineLyne18 karat solid gold and jewel encrusted Monopoly set. Photo via National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institute

Need some extraordinary holiday shopping ideas? The exhibit “Worth Its Weight: Gold From The Ground Up just opened at The Museum of American Finance, showing the ways gold has influenced our everyday lives from the American Gold Rush days to the present, along with its more unexpected uses (like the 18 karat gold Monopoly set, above). Worth Its Weight showcases hundreds of objects from over forty public and private collections.


3-Top 10 Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade Mishaps_Kermit the Frog_1991_tear_balloon_Untapped Cities_NYC_Stephanie GeierA deflated Kermit the Frog at the 1991 Thanksgiving Day Parade. Image via deseretnews.com

With less than a week before Thanksgiving, many are eagerly anticipating what kinds of diverse floats and balloons the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade will feature. While these larger-than-life balloons of our favorite characters have been a Thanksgiving tradition for 89 years, there have been quite a few shocking, incidents that occurred at past parades. While we’re not expecting anything to happen this week, it was a fun project to research vintage photographs and learn about various safety measures that resulted from the accidents.

From plane crashes to deflations, read about these crazy mishaps (and hope that none happen this year).



At Untapped Cities, the recent terrorist attacks that occurred in Paris hit extremely close to home. As the city recovers, it is important to remember Paris’ vibrant and sometimes tragic history so we can appreciate the city’s ongoing strength and vitality. While the New York Times recently featured vintage photographs of the blocks in the Paris attacks, Vincent Mahé’s new book, 750 Years in Paris, published by Nobrow Press, brings to live the City of Lights’ many triumphs and trials through architectural illustrations. Dating back to as early to 1265 and ending in 2015, Mahé focuses on a single block in the to highlight the historical events and time periods that have shaped this magical city.


Manhattans-French-Quarter_Boulangerie-Francaise_Green-Street_bakery_NYC_Untapped-Cities_Stephanie-GeierA former French bakery on Green Street. Image via Scribner’s.

New York City is currently home to several ethnic enclaves, but did you know that there also used to be a “Little France” in Soho? According to a recent post by Ephemeral New York, from the 1870s until the 1890s, Soho, specifically in the area between Washington Square South and Grand Street, and West Broadway and Greene Street was home to somewhere between 20,000 and 24,000 French immigrants.