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SoHo native Yukie Ohta and founder of The SoHo Memory Project is hoping to create a mobile historical society to chronicle the evolution of the neighborhood from rural farmland to the high-end retail hub it is today. As she writes, “SoHo currently has no neighborhood society dedicated to preserving its history, and I think it deserves one.” She’s working with the Uni Project, and fundraising on Kickstarter, to create a pop-up learning experience using non-traditional media, like Viewmaster finders, 3D printed miniatures, and a smell station, along with vintage ephemera. The end goal is to place current day SoHo in the context of New York City’s history, something Ohta feels is obscured in its landscape today.

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This article was also written in part by Samantha Sokol

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If you thought gardening was purely a white-fence suburban hobby, think again. These gardens scattered through Manhattan feature a diverse range of plants and flowers — one of them even has a pond! Check them out here. (more…)

Last year, we rounded up 10 of our favorite off-the-radar museums in New York City, from the Troll Museum to the museum that’s just in a freight elevator. It’s been so popular, we’re expanding that list with ten more unique finds.

1. Treasures in the Trash Museum

treasures-in-the-trash-east-harlem-art-museum-sanitation-department-nelson-molinaImage via Place Matters. Photo by Ariel Rosenblum

When was the last time you visited your local sanitation garage for a gallery tour?  Over the course of 33 years, sanitation worker Nelson Molina has collected thousands of items that can tell stories about NYC and its people arguably better than any hallowed institution could. His carefully curated collection titled “The Treasures in the Trash Museum” has its home in a sanitation garage on the Upper East Side. For more details, see our past coverage of this cultural marvel.

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septuagesimo uno upper west side quiet spot in new york city untapped cities alex mcquilkin

Let’s face it: Manhattan is loud. Get in touch with your inner zen for a second and avoid the screeching noise of the subway at these five spots on the quieter side. Check out a bar opened by monks, a room filled with dirt, the smallest park in NYC, and more! (more…)

With so many buildings  in the NYC skyline demanding our attention, we rarely train our eyes to the drab concrete and subway grates beneath our feet. But the city sidewalks also have much to offer. From a floating subway map etched in the ground to the ruins of the city’s first tavern, these five sidewalk spots make it worth watching your step next time you’re trying to dodge the crowds.

1. The Maiden Lane Clock

Next time you’re in the Financial District, if you happen to find yourself on the corner of Maiden Lane and Broadway, look down! You’ll find a beautiful (and working) clock beneath your feet, a sidewalk advertisement for William Barthman Jewelers located a few steps away. The store has been there for over 130 years, surviving multiple attempts at gentrification–so give them some credit and watch your step!

Manhattan Financial District Untapped Cities Dunja Lazic

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1-Soho Windows

Small circular glass bulbs dot the sidewalks of Soho–are they chic street stylings or art? The glass circles are actually remnants of Soho’s industrial past, a signifier of the original factory function of the buildings. The glass bulbs are actually tiny windows–called “vault lights” or deadlights–to allow sunlight into the basement factories before the introduction of electricity.

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